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Low MCV and MCH on my blood test can you help me decipher this test result?

My RBC is High (5.35) and my MCV (80.4) and MCH (26.7) are low. Could someone explain to me what this means? Should I be eating more red meat? (Anemia) Lil' bit more info: 25 year old female, 275, Non Smoker non drinker. Mother of one. Anymore info just ask! Don't be a jerk about the answer. Just give me an honest answer.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    MCV (mean corpuscular volume) refers to the size of each red blood cell. MCH (mean corpuscular hemoglobin) refers to the concentration of hemoglobin in each red blood cell. If MCV and MCH are low, it means your red blood cells are smaller than average (MCV) and paler than average (MCH), and can't carry as much oxygen as normal. This is usually caused by an iron deficiency anemia.

    Red meat does contain iron, but it may be healthier to look for a multivitamin that includes iron.

    Have they tested for iron levels or TIBC (total iron binding capacity)? These tests help verify the anemia is due to iron deficiency.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

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    RE:

    Low MCV and MCH on my blood test can you help me decipher this test result?

    My RBC is High (5.35) and my MCV (80.4) and MCH (26.7) are low. Could someone explain to me what this means? Should I be eating more red meat? (Anemia) Lil' bit more info: 25 year old female, 275, Non...

    Source(s): mcv mch blood test decipher test result: https://knowledge.im/?s=mcv+mch+blood+test+deciphe...
  • 7 years ago

    I guarantee you that you have Beta Thalassemia minor. I have it as well. My doctor when doing routine blood work pointed out that I had iron deficiency anemia. I had forgot to mention that I have Beta Thalassemia minor before my test. Point being, a lot of doctors won't corroborate your high RBC along with your low MCV and MCH levels. It's a genetic inherited condition that is actually one of if not the most common blood disorders Worldwide. It is highly prevalent In the Mediterranean region, Middle East and Asia. I have no known ethnic relation to any people of that region but all the men in my family are positive for the condition. In short, your red blood cells are misshapen and small. Because of this they don't adequately carry the amount of oxygen and hemoglobin through the bloodstream. To compensate your body produces excess red blood cells to still transport the required volume through the body, hence the increase in the RBC. I would guess that your liver function Billirubin levels are slightly elevated and lower in Iron Binding Capacity. The spleen destroys red blood cells and a biproduct of this process is bilirubin. Naturally because you have higher concentration of red blood cells being produced, more are destroyed and hence the number will either be higher than the range, or right at the higher end of the range.

    The good news: The condition is totally benign. You can eat all the red meat you want or take all the B Complex Vitamins you want, it won't make any difference. Your levels will immediately go back to the levels on your test. There are no real symptoms of this condition. Most people will not report feeling tired or fatigued for the simple fact they don't know any different, that's the way they've always felt.

    I would ask my doctor specifically about Beta Thalassemia Minor and if you may have the trait. The only potential issue with this condition is if you married someone who had it as well. You're offspring would have the chance to get both of the recessive traits and be born a Major. This is a debilitating and virtual death sentence to the child. They must undergo constant blood transfusions which will eventually become less effective until death. In many Eastern, more homogenous societies such as Greece, among others, it is required by law to have this test prior to marriage due to the large % of the population who carry this trait and high propensity to thus render children afflicted with Major.

    You can find anything else you want to know prior to speaking to your doctor with a simple google search for Beta Thalassemia Minor or something along the lines of Blood Work results for Beta Thalassemia Minor. This will show the specifics for your own comparison.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

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    Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV) helps diagnose the cause of an anemia. Low values suggest iron deficiency. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin, or "mean cell hemoglobin" (MCH) is the average mass of hemoglobin per red blood cell in a sample of blood. MCH value is low in hypochromic anemias. Hypochromic anemia may be caused by vitamin B6 deficiency from a low iron intake, diminished iron absorption, or excessive iron loss. It can also be caused by infections (e.g. hookworms) or other diseases, therapeutic drugs, and lead poisoning. It may also occur from severe stomach or intestinal bleeding caused by ulcers or medications such as aspirin.It can also occur in thalassemia.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Low MCV and your Hemoglobin need to be higher to determine if you have beta thalassemia. My mom have beta thalassemia and my dad has hemophilia. I just got tested back in July of 2015 and I m getting tested again tomorrow because my RBC (high), RDW (little high) & ALT (little high) and I have very low MCV & MCH and everything else is normal. Since they determine I can t absorb iron and I may have liver issue.

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    I totally agree with Brien. I did not know anything about Beta Thalassemia until my third child was born. The doctors told me about my child's life threatening illness. I did more research and found out that my wife has a trait as well.

    My son received a bone marrow transplant at CHOC 12 years ago. The doctors and the staff there are wonderful. He is completely out of the woods. Thank God that my son is normal and healthy now. He does not have to take any medications.

    It hit home as I read Brien comments:

    "I would ask my doctor specifically about Beta Thalassemia Minor and if you may have the trait. The only potential issue with this condition is if you married someone who had it as well. You're offspring would have the chance to get both of the recessive traits and be born a Major. This is a debilitating and virtual death sentence to the child."

    God gave my child a second chance in life. My son wants to serve God and wants to be a doctor to save other people.

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  • 6 years ago

    My MCV on my blood work is 80.5 should I be worried, but all the others are ok, but I had neck surgery don't 7 months ago, maybe that has something to do with it.

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    I am 27 year old, male, I am low MCV too, I tested (85) for normal value (85-95). I always got tied, also my hand and foe are cold.

    So what food for eating to high iron?

  • 5 years ago

    Mch On Blood Test

  • 5 years ago

    rdw

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