What does perspective mean in Photography?

If you are to take a photograph of something and have to show perspective, what does that mean? Something having to do with distance?

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  • Terisu
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    This article explains it pretty well:

    Perspective, in context of vision and visual perception, is the way in which objects appear to the eye based on their spatial attributes, or their dimensions and the position of the eye relative to the objects.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_%28visual...

    This one will also be helpful:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_%28graphi...

  • 4 years ago

    Perspective In Photography

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    RE:

    What does perspective mean in Photography?

    If you are to take a photograph of something and have to show perspective, what does that mean? Something having to do with distance?

    Source(s): perspective photography: https://trimurl.im/j73/what-does-perspective-mean-...
  • 1 decade ago

    Specifically, it means the point of view from which the photograph is taken. In photography, you're trying to convey three dimensionality on a two dimensional surface (paper), so creating the illusion of depth has to be done through conscious attention to the angles from which photos are made. You can see this for yourself by looking at a scene and noticing the various nuances that develop as you go from a standing position to one lower to the ground. Lines that are parallel in the foreground converge onto the horizon in the background...this can be used with remarkable impact with a little thoughtful planning before you close the shutter (take the shot). Other times, viewing objects such as buildings conveys visual interest by having two or more vanishing points when seen from the sharp corner of the structure. Perspective "problems" can develop as easily. If you're not careful, buildings, signs, light poles and things of this nature can appear to topple over if your angle of view is too acute, so be aware of this also when composing your shots. Mostly, just have fun with it....you learn by doing.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Perspective is the line of sight, or the way you/the camera looks at the subject.

    Think about how the perspective changes when you photograph kids either standing straight up, or down on your knees.

    How about if you were standing in a crowd and shot all the people, or how would it look different if you could climb a ladder and shoot the same crowd.

    And the perspective of distance. How different does a tree look when you are far away and the tree is full frame, or you are close to it, and capturing only a portion of the tree.

  • 1 decade ago

    Perspective is all about the way the photographer sees something that someone else sees a different way. Yes, it can be a special angle unshot by others, but a true perspective by an artist is more about the big picture and the message being relayed. All of the components in the shot are taken into consideration (lighting, pose, expressions, outfits, angle, thematic material). They all come together to tell you what the photographer was going for.

  • 4 years ago

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  • 1 decade ago

    Not distance but the way something is seen.

    For example, if I wanted to show the perspective of a mouse, I'd get the camera real low to the ground and probably use a wide angle lens to make things appear BIG.

  • Todd
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Become Professional Photographer http://PhotographyMasterclass.enle.info/?Hu1q
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