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Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceHomework Help · 1 decade ago

1920's kkk???

ok so which minority groups besides african americans did they target?

and what contemporary cultural and social changes did the kkk of the 20's speccifically purpose?

Update:

ooo thanks a lot!

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Jews, Hispanics, Catholic immigrants from Europe.

    In reaction to social changes, the Klan adopted anti-Jewish, anti-Catholic, anti-Communist and anti-immigrant slants. The social unrest of the postwar period included labor strikes over low wages and working conditions in many industrial cities, often led by immigrants, who also organized unions. Klan members worried about labor organizers and socialist leanings of some of the immigrants, which added to the tensions. They also resented upwardly mobile ethnic Catholics.At the same time, in cities Klan members were themselves working in industrial environments and often struggled with working conditions.

    Klan groups lynched and murdered Black soldiers returning from World War I while they were still in military uniforms.The Klan warned Blacks that they must respect the rights of the white race "in whose country they are permitted to reside."The number of lynchings escalated, and from 1918 to 1927, 416 African Americans were killed.

    In Florida, when two black men attempted to vote in November 1920 in Ocoee, Orange County, the Klan attacked the black community.[citation needed] In the ensuing violence six black residents and two whites were killed, and twenty five black homes, two churches, and a fraternal lodge were destroyed.

    Although Klan members were concentrated in the South, Midwest and west, there were some members in New England, too. Klan members torched an African American school in Scituate, Rhode Island.

    In the 1920s and 1930s, a violent and zealous faction of the Klan called the Black Legion was active in the Midwestern U.S.. The Legion wore black uniforms and targeted and assassinated communists and socialists.

    In southern cities such as Birmingham, Alabama, Klan members kept control of access to the better-paying industrial jobs but opposed unions. During the 1930s and 1940s, Klan leaders urged members to disrupt the [[Congress of Industrial Organizations[[ (CIO), which advocated industrial unions and was open to African-American members. With access to dynamite and skills from their jobs in mining and steel, in the late 1940s, some Klan members in Birmingham began using bombings to intimidate upwardly mobile blacks who moved into middle-class neighborhoods. "By mid-1949, there were so many charred house carcasses that the area [College Hills] was informally named Dynamite Hill." Independent Klan groups remained active in Birmingham and were deeply engaged in violent opposition to the Civil Rights Movement.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    It would be easier to say "They're not against anyone!. They just want it to be all white."

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