Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 decade ago

american spelling and british spelling?

I'm an aussie born and over here in Aus we use english spelling. I honestly dont understand why the people here in and the UK think that american spelling is so wrong. Americans will spell and pronounce words according to the way they are written and spoken in the alphabet. Their spelling is also more consistent and easier to understand. For example the english will spell major and major, but for some reason they will spell humor(american) as humour. This makes absolutely no sense. THere are several instances where the british spelling will simply add extra letters into a word, extra letters that arent needed, like in the word: programme and oestrogen (program and estrogen- american). Who cares if the english came up with the language, american spelling is more direct and correct. US spelling should replace English spelling just like the metric system replaced the imperial system. Are there any other non-americans out there who feel the same way about this?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I'm English (from England) and I much prefer English spelling. American spelling frustrates me when I read it, so I'd have to disagree with you completely!

    The English language is not phonetic and the spellings have never reflected exact pronunciation. It's just the way it is, and I like it that way. It really annoys me the way Americans change spellings of things and still call it English, it should be called 'American'. When I watch American TV sometimes I can't understand what they're saying as there are more and more differences between the languages Americans and Brits speak. I think eventually it will become two different languages.

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  • Wendy
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    American cuz I'm American, although here are the British spellings I like better (US spelling in parentheses): 1) licence (license) 2) offence (offense) 3) defence (defense) 4) zed (zee) 5) mum (mom) 6) fuelling (fueling) 7) refuelling (fuelling) Where I don't care either way: 1) metre/meter (measurement) 2) litre/liter 3) grey/gray 4) sulphur/sulfur 5) spelt/spelled 6) burnt/burned When I speak of organized labor, I'll spell it either 'organized labor' or 'organised labour' the British spellings that are just as valid as the American spelling: 1) cancelled (I prefer this over canceled) 2) axe (I prefer this over ax)

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  • 1 decade ago

    What's annoying to me, as an American, isn't the spellings. Color, colour - so what!? Variety, as they say, is the spice of life. No, what's annoying is people who are snobbish about one spelling system or one accent over another. One of the other answers said something about American spellings not being English. Bologna! English is English. As long as you're understood by other English speakers and haven't used a language other than English (like Swahili or Danish or something), then you have successfully conversed in English. That's just how it is.

    Do you check the color of your estrogen or do you cheque the colour of your oestrogen?

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  • 1 decade ago

    Actually I'm not really bothered. Since young, I've been learning British English but I read a wide genre of books by various writers so I've inherited a pretty good knowledge of the difference in the spelling of both languages. You're right that American spelling and pronounciation is more consistent. I used to have a problem spelling center (US) and centre (British) as phonetically speaking, it really doesn't seem logical to relate the British spelling of 're' to the 'er' sound. I wasn't aware of it until my teacher pointed out the difference to me. To this day, I still think that center (US) should be used in British spelling too. Anyway, in my opinion, British English sounds more formal while US English sounds more casual.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    This is not always correct. For example the word "kerb" which is in American "curb" and means the concrete step up from the street, is differenciated from "curb" which means to stop something. Having two different spellings (English) ends the confusion of which meaning you are using.

    And there are other words where it makes no difference such as when Americans spell "offence" as "offense".

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yep same with colour and color, jail and gaol, and yes I'm and aussie too, but as you can see, jail is spelt how its pronounced but where the heck did gaol come from, sounds nothing like the word, so that pretty much blows your theory, americans tend to spell this in simpler terms hence the abbreviated world that we live in now, its ridiculous really, my nana who was english pronounced ridiculour and re dick le ous, used to crack me up, same as my brother with psgetti for spaghetti, I think its quite amusing really!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Its confusing.. cuz lyk im from Gibraltar which uses the Uk language but i read alot of American books and i always get my spelling marked wrong...

    x

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    hard aspect. research into search engines like google. that will could actually help!

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  • 1 decade ago

    Frankly, i don't mind.

    But i prefer American speaking, sounds clearer and 'attactive' to me.

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  • 1 decade ago

    i think nobody really cares

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