Any special corner shop memories to share...........?

Mine is beautiful iced almonds on doilies on little plates

Lucozade wrapped in orange cellophane

The shiny brass bell clanging entering the shop

Update:

Fabulous answers everyone, keep them coming please for everyone to read and remember when times were hard but happy.........

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  • clara
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    My local village corner shop when I was a child in the sixties was run from the tiny front room of a small terrace house by an old spinster who always wore a black dress with her grey hair in plaits tied on top of her head, some of the local kids used to think she was a witch but went to buy their sweets there anyhow, typical kids! My favourite sweets were sherbet lemons that always managed to give you a sore tongue if you ate too many, five boys chocolate, huge gob stoppers and of course packets of crisps with the little blue bag of salt in the packet. Sweets these days just don't seem as good as they were back then when they came out of a tall jar and were eaten out of a little paper bag. They were a really treat and you only had them if you'd been good and behaved yourself that day!!

  • 1 decade ago

    Hmm, I think about that place often. We weren't allowed to walk there unless an adult was with us (neighborhood was dangerous even back then) and although it was only 2 blocks away, it always felt like it was sooooo far away. The corner store was a....not sure what it was. It was dark inside. There was a light on in the hot peanut case, and I think there was a bare light bulb over the newspaper rack but the rest of the store was dark and--dusty? Old, that's for sure. They were extremely limited on what they had--some chewing gum, some local newspapers, a few of the more popular magazines (Life, Look, Saturday Evening Post). Cigarettes and cigars behind the counter. There was an area toward the back but I don't remember ever going back there since it was so dark. I don't even remember what the "clerk" looked like, if it was a woman or man. Dad would buy the Sunday paper there on Saturday evening (can't think of anything else we'd need to go there for). Next door, or at least close by, was the hardware store which was bright and woody and had all these fun things. And the dry cleaner where dad would get his shirts cleaned and pressed and wrapped in blue bundles. Light starch please. I think there was a bar--one of those sleazy bars with the windows painted over, mom would always make us walk on the other side of her from the bar just so some drinker wouldn't grab us and pull us in (like that'd ever happen). And for a short time, someone opened a very narrow candy store--oh, my, you could get lots and lots of candy for a penny (but we didn't have money so we just went along with our richer friends).

  • 1 decade ago

    The candy lipsticks and the many varieties of candy all in different little boxes, and oh yes, the price was a delight to eye! Three of them for a nickel, my how that has changed. Now the same candy is fifteen cents a piece or at best a nickel each. A smiling face a friend to talk to, bottles of coke for a quarter, now priced at $1.25 to $1.59. Sharing with friends and the wooden smell of the shops, now only replaced by no smell or by someones perfume or aftershave. Fumes of oil trucks and city cars, diesel and reg., coughing children, adults, teens. Oh for the days when all was so tranquil. The schools, some of them still have the cafeteria smells, home made buns and homemade cooking. Your aunts and their friends and mom's too, all gathering to help make the school day I bit more tolerable.

  • 1 decade ago

    I do remember when the country store was the heart of a community.The men would gather around a pot belly stove and talk about the weather,politics, and whatever else came to mind.It was always a place to go ask questions that were sometimes tough to ask at home.It was a place that neighbors would gather and have a coke and make sure their neighbors were doing o.k., Like I say, it was the heart of the community, well, it was for guys like me,its something we don't see anymore except on rare occasions.Oh what good times we had at the "store".I even thought of writing a book on the country stores across America.I can just imagine the funny , heartwarming, and sometimes horrific tales that could be told.oh the memories......

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Everlasting strips, gob stoppers that literally did that and changed colour too the longer you sucked them, Sweets in jars which were purchased by weight (2, 4 or 8 ounces) and the scales and shovel inside the jars. Sherbet dabs with a toffee on a stick. Chocolate Wagon wheels that were just that - i.e. enormous!!!! Dexresol - which werer an alternative to sweets per se, when sweets were 'rationed'.Ditto blue paper twists of Saltanas/currants/raisins.

    The very distinctive sweet smell which always emanated from the local 'sweet shop' - I'd know it anywhere!!!

  • 1 decade ago

    There was a stall down our market that sold Sarsaparilla

    drink such a weird taste (like germaline) whatever happend to them both? Our corner shop let you have things on tick until Friday Pay Day (no credit cards or debts those days. You took a list in to the corner shop and they delivered your groceries on a bike, Also I remember the shop keeper cutting the cheese and butter with a wire 0h those were the days!

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    My best memory involves a fish and chip shop(sorry for those across the pond, this might not mean anything to you).

    Anyway, for a penny we could buy what we called the crackling which was the pieces of batter that floated off the fish. This would be placed in a piece of newspaper and eaten as we walked home. You got an awful lot for a penny and thank goodness we had never heard of cholesterol

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I remember how packed the shelves and counters were, the aprons the shopkeepers wore, the friendliness, the liquorice twigs, orange jublies, and the groceries were all weighed and measured on the premises.

    Do you remember the bundles of firewood, the penny cold drinks in a glass that you drank in the shop, and the mixture of smells.

  • Leslie
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    When I was a little kid the corner store was owned by a tiny old man named Sunny. He was not too much larger than we were but he ran the store and the candy counter. He had all the latest magazines that a kid like me would love to check out. The Beatles and teen mags etc. He used to let me come in and read his magazines. I never ever bought one. He also served as my savior the times I did something dispicable to one of my brothers and had to make a mad dash to Sunny's. He was just a cool person and I miss him even today.

  • 1 decade ago

    Topaz try Marks and Sparks by the checkouts ,the best Walnut whips you can get these days ,My brother in law ran a corner shop and in the sixties there was a song the Legend of the Teenage opera Keith West about Grocer Jack ,It was one of the first songs my Twin boys learned how to sing .

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