How much runway does a Boeing 747 need to land?

length of Plane= 76.4m

wing span= 68.5

max weight= 440 000kg

Update:

at a standard landing speed

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  • 1 decade ago
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    I'm a pilot and I fly 747-400 often into JFK. They need about

    6,500 to 7,000 feet to land.

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  • 4 years ago

    Yes, a 747 can easily land on a runway of that length. A 747-400 can land in that length of runway even at maximum landing weight, on a standard day and a dry runway at sea level. In fact, even a 747-400 freighter at maximum landing weight can land on such a runway, as long as it's a standard day with a dry runway and the airport is below 8000 feet or so in altitude.

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    How much runway does a Boeing 747 need to land?

    length of Plane= 76.4m

    wing span= 68.5

    max weight= 440 000kg

    Source(s): runway boeing 747 land: https://shortly.im/h2bTE
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  • 1 decade ago

    Most companies that operate 747s have a policy about minimum runway length. The company I worked for required a minimum of 9,000 feet, but we rarely actually landed on a runway shorter than 10,000 feet in revenue service.

    My crew actually landed in less than 6,000 feet on one or two occasions, but not with paying passengers aboard. A cakewalk, in fact.

    The 747, like all jet airliners from Boeing and its imitators, is a gigantic replica of the North American F-86 fighter plane of the late 1940s--one of the most brilliant designs in aviation history. It is even-tempered, easy to handle, and comes with a built-in Will to Survive that makes it hard to get into serious trouble.

    Fantastic airplane. I will wake up dreaming of flying the 747-400 until the day I die.

    Source(s): retired airline captain
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  • 3 years ago

    747 Length

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  • 1 decade ago

    I've seen 747-200s, 747-400s land on EWR's runway 11/29 many times.

    EWR's runway 11/29 is 6,800ft long.

    I've seen AF1 land @ Patrick AFB and I believe its only 7500ft in length. So yes a 747 can land and depart on short runways. Its part of its STOL capability. Go in heavy and take off light. You just have to know your mins.

    So around 6500 ft not fully loaded is the minimals.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Here;s a chart showing how much runway each model of B747 needs :

    747-100 747-200B........747-300........747-400

    ...........3,190 m.................3,320 m.......3,018 m.

    • cian4 years agoReport

      no thats wrong i know the 747 can land at 2300.021m. and it can go shoeter than that

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  • Mark
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    How light is it? How much headwind? What is the runway gradient? What density altitude?

    It's less than 5000 feet with no wind, and that is without using reverse thrust.

    jojo: the question is about landing--not takeoff--distance.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It depends on many factors:

    - Weight and speed of the plane

    - Temperature of the runway

    - Air pressure

    - Density of air

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  • 5 years ago

    You didn't specified what you mean by "need". Need physically or need as defined by safety regulations and used in real life? Length of necessary runway by regulation, depends above all from landing speed, which by regulations for safety reasons is predetermined to be specific percentage value above stall speed, which depends on total weight of the plane, which in turn depends on weight of fuel, passengers and cargo plane is carrying (where speed varies considerably between minimum and maximum), from temperature and pressure of air (which defines its density), as well from flaps setting and runway condition as wet, iced etc. In real life pilots enter so called ZFW value (Zero Fuel Wight) provided on special document called "Load Sheet" provided by ground services responsible for loading and balancing the plane before take off, into FMC (Flight Management Computer) - on board computer in cockpit, specify airport temperature and pressure, runway surface condition (dry, wet, iced), as well desired flap settings which allows FMC to calculate landing speed (V AT). As FMC tracks fuel consumption and remaining fuel during flight, it knows and can predict precisely in the future total weight of the plane, exactly at the time of landing. In theory FMC also knows what is safe minimum length of the runway and will alert pilot if runway with insufficient length is chosen for landing, still, believe it or not, for safety reasons, in order to create redundancy, pilots use paper tables and graphs, than are required to enter calculated manually values into flight documentation. Additionally, different air carriers use different safety margins. Halo, as the ONLY one, summarized (to all likelihood with only one unintended purely accidental typo), all most important variables. Wiki reference provided by Jono on other hand are completely unusable, as they only give runway lengths at MTOW (minimum take off weight). Safe runway lengths for take off and landings represent completely two different values.

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