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Anonymous asked in Entertainment & MusicTelevisionDrama · 1 decade ago

Can you explain the ending of "No Country For Old Men" to me?

--I watched this and hated it. Maybe it's just because I didn't get the ending. Lou Ellen (Yeah, I know I spelt it wrong.) is dead right?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Great assertion by An upstanding citizen!

    I'm baffled by how people don't understand what this movie's about!! Do people just completely ignore the narration by Tommy Lee Jones? The entire time he's talking about how he fails to understand why there are people who can do such cruel and inhumane acts.

    And presented in the movie is Anton Chigur who personifies all that Tommy Lee Jones is reflecting on in his narration! It's all put out in the open and made pretty obvious by the Coen Brothers!

    I think many people can't understand that a movie can be about a character, and profiles a character and the evil that a person can hold within themselves. In so many movies we're presented with the same type of figure - Hannibal Lecter, Kevin Spacey in Seven, Christian Bale in American Psycho, and so on and so forth.

    Is it because people are so used to movies that are so obvious and predictable that they hate a movie like No Country for Old Men? It is that they're so used to a movie about an evil person being the torture-porn that movie-goers are sadly subjected to in form like Saw (and all incarnations that spawned from it), The Hills Have Eyes and whatever other movie that has no purpose other than to show how much blood and gore a movie can contain without being labeled "NC-17" or a Dario Argento knockoff (without the creativity)?!

    If you hated No Country for Old Men, than stick to something like the american version of The Grudge or Transformers or 10,000 BC.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The movie was not about chase, nor money, nor drug deal nor killing. It was not about a man on the run, nor a man that cannot be stopped. Nay, the movie is indeed about either the progression into violence that our society (and all societies) eventually meet, or seen from another side, the fact that at the end of the day, things have always been this decrepid and bad, but when we're young we're part of it instead of appalled by it.

    As you get older, you start to get distanced, mentally, from the fast-paced life and start to wonder how someone could be so cold, so distant. It's not about the society changing around you. It's about you changing as you grow older, while society remains the same. This place, it's always been the same, but it's never been a place for old men.

    It's a character study.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The ending is wonderful if you give some thought to it.

    I'll just get the Llewelyn issue out of the way first: yes, he's dead, and so is his wife. Anton checks his boots for blood after leaving her home.

    As for the ending itself, you have to consider the film as a whole. It opens with Sheriff Bell's telling a story about a murderer who said he would kill again if released from prison over footage of the desolate Texas landscape. His point is that sometimes it seems futile to even try to stop evil; evil will always win out. It's why he's planning to retire from law enforcement.

    During the action of the movie, Bell is trying to track down Anton, an amoral sociopath with no respect for the law. He kills who he wants. He's basically evil personified. And no matter how hard Bell tries, he can't stop Anton from killing.

    And in the end, Anton has the money. Anton has killed Moss, his wife, Wells, and the man who hired him. Anton walks away. All of Bell's work was for naught.

    And so, we end with Bell right where he started: telling a story. This time, it's about the dream he had about following his dead father on horseback. The story provides a bookend to complement the beginning; he has learned what his father once learned. The bad guys will eventually win, even if you dedicate your life to stopping them. And so, he has no choice but to follow his father into the sunset. To leave it behind and sit by the fire.

    It's beautiful how they tie in the barren desert plains from the start of the film with the similarly bleak result. The landscape is, and will always be, desolate. Murderers will continue to murder, no matter how much you try to deter them with prison, the death penalty, what have you.

    It's not a pick-me-up, but it's certainly a fantastic choice from an artistic viewpoint.

    Source(s): my mind. It's late, so this might not be as eloquent as it could be. But I've had this conversation before.
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  • 1 decade ago

    In the last scene, which is set several years in the future, The Sheriff, now retired tells his wife about two dreams he had that night. the first, he sez is about some money he lost. this dream he does not explain, indicating the insignificance of the money in the movie. The second dream, he explains is about his Dad and him in olden times on horseback in a dark country and his dad has horn filled with fire and rides ahead. The sheriff explains that he knows that when he follows and catches up to his dad there will be light in the darkness. This in analogy of his life, following in his father's footsteps to bring light by being a lawman as his father was and bring light to the border country by battling evil. There is a note of regret in his voice as if he may of retired to soon or that eventually the evil was to much for him to continue to fight. This emphasis the true significance of the movie, the battle of good and evil and that the war is never won.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The old ways that were better are dying, and you are not supposed to like the end. Young people haven't the memory to understand the end. I've been here over 6 decades, and I see where America is headed, and I don't like it. Unlike most people, I understand how America is going to end. You aren't going to like it. No one is. But people won't listen.

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  • 1 decade ago

    the movie makes a statement about changing times in america. about fate and consequence, about growing old and helpless in a progressively violent and selfish world.....

    the ending was meant to be thought provoking.

    a good piece of art (like a movie) gives you something interesting to think about, often involving human nature and experience. good art doesn't tell you how to feel about it or what lesson you should learn from it, but lets you draw these connections for yourself and your own personal context.

    great movie!

    Source(s): drfunnel.com
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  • 1 decade ago

    Llewelyn Moss (Brolin) tries to meet with his wife Carla Jean (Macdonald) at a motel, but he ends up getting shot and killed by the gang of Mexicans that hunted for him at the beginning.

    Sheriff Ed Tom Bell (Jones) arrives seconds after the event and is so shocked by his failure to protect Moss that he decides to retire. He also realises that Anton Chigurh (Bardem) is a force that cannot be stopped. He returns to the motel room later that night where he finds the keyholes to two doors missing, and he realises that Chigurh is hiding inside one of them.

    Bell's fate leads to the door he picks instead of a coin toss. He picks the empty room hence he gets to live. While inside he finds an air vent that has been opened with a coin.

    Chigurh tracks down Carla Jean and flips a coin for her. She refuses to call it, and it is implied that he kills her (as he leaves, he looks at his shoes for blood).

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    wow. i watched this and hated it. i thought i understood it, and i did get all the points right, but it wasn't until i read the answer by An Upstanding Citizen (above) that i really understood this movie and i now have a much better appreciation for it. thank you.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes he is dead. As well as his wife. I think you would enjoy the movie much more if you had read the book.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I guess. The light from that passing horseman's firehorn was pretty dim.

    I could use a good 'splainin' of jus' how it ended, too!

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