Marine Officer Vs. Marine Enlisted (serious question)?

I am interested in joining the military and have a few questions that I need answered.

1. What branch of military is the best? (Navy, Army, Air Force, Marines)

2. What is the difference of becoming a Marine Officer versus becoming a Marine Enlisted?

3. What is ROTC and/or JROTC?

4. And what is the best way to become a special ops member?

Update:

5. If I were to join the Marines as an enlisted, would it be possible to rank up and if so, how far up could I go?

11 Answers

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  • Karin
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    1. I love the Corps, but am incredibly biased. To each his own as it depends on what you want to do.

    2. Marine Corps boot camp...13 weeks of hell to become an enlisted US Marine. The enlisted do not need a degree, are underpaid, overworked, and most respected by anyone who knows because E-1 through E-5 pay grades CARRY the entire US military (as that's where the vast majority of the troops are). Marine Corps Officer Candidate School...8 weeks of actual OCS and 18 more weeks of TBS (The Basic School)...so 26 weeks of hell to become a Marine Corps officer. Officers do need a degree, are paid pretty well, work even longer hours than most enlisted, and get almost no respect from anyone until they're an O-3 or so. Also, in terms of the Marines only the enlisted side gets to pick their job (MOS). Officers get to create a wish list but ultimately the Corps picks.

    3. ROTC and NROTC are scholarship programs offered through the military that give free education prior to taking your commission as an officer. To get an (N)ROTC scholarship you must have a high grade point average, high standardized test scores, community service, letters of recommendation from community figures (like teachers), be willing to spend two summers doing training for your respective branch, and sign a six year active duty commission. JROTC is a program offered in high school that is supposed to ready you for the vigors of the military. Its benefits vary by area.

    4. Special operations, in most cases are an assigned job as part of the infantry. This does not mean you have to enlist as infantry, but each area has its different ways to get in to. That's something a recruiter would have to handle.

    Semper Fi and good luck.

    PS...Just in case anyone wants to argue with my respect theory I'll clarify now. Even officers respect enlisted...Respect and authority are two very different things (junior enlisted have little authority compared to junior officers).

    EDIT:

    5. Enlisted promotions are done in the Marines as follows. E-1 through E-3 are done by time in grade (assuming you haven't gotten in trouble). If I remember correctly it takes six months at PVT (E-1) to pick up PFC (E-2). Eight more months to pick up LCpl (E-3) from PFC. Cpl and Sgt are picked up via cutting scores, which are based on time in grade, MOS, PFT scores and a whole host of other things that won't really make sense if I try to explain them correctly (and quickly). Once you hit the staff NCO ranks (E-6 and above) it's done by fit reps. A fit rep is essentially a package that puts your performance as a Marine in perspective compared to another Marine. Fit reps are reviewed by a board, rather than a points system. There are, as always, a hundred other things that can affect ranks and promotion rates like meritorious boards, negative time in grade, NJPs, stop loss, etc...But it's a lot to explain and that is the most common way promotion works. Highest possible rank is SgtMaj of the Marine Corps. He's the head cheese of the enlisted side (like the Commandant of the enlisted, so to speak). He still is, however, an E-9...That's the highest pay grade that exists in any branch on the enlisted side.

    I've never given my info before, but I get the impression you're truly interested and I can explain it better if you want more details...sooooo...my email addy is paypalmademegetthis@yahoo (not kidding!) so feel free to email me if you have more questions.

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  • 3 years ago

    Officer Vs Enlisted

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Marine Officer Vs. Marine Enlisted (serious question)?

    I am interested in joining the military and have a few questions that I need answered.

    1. What branch of military is the best? (Navy, Army, Air Force, Marines)

    2. What is the difference of becoming a Marine Officer versus becoming a Marine Enlisted?

    3. What is ROTC and/or JROTC?

    4. And what is...

    Source(s): marine officer marine enlisted question: https://tr.im/7RI2M
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  • 1 decade ago

    I've talked to many recruiters because i've been thinking of enlisting too. My advice, if you already started college finish and become an officer. The difference between an officer and enlisted is basically that an officer has more schooling and makes more money than enlisted. You have to have a bachelor's degree or if you enlist after a certain amount of time you can apply for OCS (officer candidate school). Which branch you go into depends on what you like to do, and wether or not you do well on you ASVAB(Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery). In order to get into the branch and career you want you have to get a minimum score. Hands down the best branches for quality of living and life are the Air Force, the Marines, or the Coast Guard. Good Luck with whatever you decide to do.

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  • Sarah
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/avuzp

    "But recently i talked to some new officers (fresh out of College NROTC)" That is as bad as taking advice from a freaking Poolee or a Recruit fresh from boot camp... What experience and perspective do they have to draw upon? Think about it. That is like taking advice about Harvard from an incoming freshman And just so you know...you stand a VERY, VERY small chance of ever being in direct combat. Ever. So if you make a life changing decision based on a 0.05% chance..that alone is stupid. I have served 23 years in the US Army..9 of those enlisted and 42 months of that was in 4 combat deployments...2 of those involving pretty intense combat ops...which I dare say is more than the majority of Marines who have shorter deployments. In those 42 months you could cram the amount of direct combat (as in directly engaging the enemy) I saw into about 6 hours total. Yet in my 9 years enlisted I probably have 2-3000 hours manning a mop, broom and floor buffer. See what I mean? My advice? Don't listen to 1. Poolees/DEPers 2. New Lieutenants/Cadets/Midshipmen 3. Anyone who got out more than 20 years ago (heck I would even say 10 - the military has changed that much in 10 years) Why don't you find your local USMC Reserve unit and actually talk to some real Marine Officers and enlisted men who have actually served more than a day and have probably deployed.

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  • 1 decade ago

    only from those 4? i guess it depends what you like to do. Would you mind being on a ship for months at a time or do you want to be on land in a combat zone? do you want to save lives and have a less than 1% chance to go to combat (they choose coast guard even though its not one of your options)

    An officer v. enlisted..hmm officers walk around like they have a stick up their *** (at least that what my shipmates and I used to say) they are more of a "leadership" role while enlisted is more of a "follower" role however when i was in the military the enlisted personnel was always the one with natural born leadership skills. officers get paid more

    ROTC is a program offered at many colleges that will make you a military officer. many choose to do that instead of going to a service-academy.

    JROTC is a high school version. don't know much about it but I don't think it is "real military" training cause all the JROTC people I ever seen did not look like very military-like (uniforms always out of guidelines, no military bearing, etc..)

    dont know anything about special ops. maybe talk to a recruiter

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  • 1 decade ago

    Karin said it.

    Read this book: making of a marine officer by Nathaniel Fick.

    Capt. Fick became a Marine Officer after graduating from Dartmouth College. He served in Afghanistan as an Infantry Officer and then in the initial invasion of Iraq as a Recon Officer. Basically Fick is the man and he wrote an awesome biography.

    Here is a preview of what you will face at OCS:

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5778038524...

    Source(s): USMC Officer Candidate
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I always see questions like this. Understand this, ONE BRANCH IS NOT BETTER THAN THE OTHER. They all have their different purposes. I'm not in the military so I cant tell about my own experience.

    And with officers, its not that one or the other are better its who you are. If you are a leader and want responsibility then be and officer. Sure they get paid more but that's not why people become officers. You will have people looking to you to make decisions, ones that may be life or death. It is not a matter of which is better but if you are a leader.

    Enlisted Would be the ones to follow. There are more jobs for enlisted. The thing is you might end up moping floors or cleaning jeeps when the officers don't. I am not saying that all enlisted jobs suck, but unless you get a good score on your asvab test you might not like you job options.

    So basically what I'm saying is nothing is better just different. Hay mabey you like to mop. But in the military there are no guarantees that you will get what you want.

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  • 4 years ago

    Need more details

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  • AJ
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    join the Navy...I was a Marine..enlisted gets the shaft and officers just signed paperwork and conducted ceremonies the Navy treats it ppl better

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