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Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

Was the forbidden fruit Eve ate really an apple?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    APPLE

    [Heb., tap‧pu′ach].

    There is much conjecture as to the identification of the tree and fruit denoted by the Hebrew word tap‧pu′ach. The word itself indicates that which is distinguished by its fragrance, or scent. It comes from the root na‧phach′, meaning “blow; pant; struggle for breath.” (Ge 2:7; Job 31:39; Jer 15:9) Regarding this, M. C. Fisher wrote: “Relationship [to na‧phach′] seems at first semantically strained, but the ideas of ‘breathe’ and ‘exhale an odor’ are related. The by-form puah means both ‘blow’ (of wind) and ‘exhale a pleasant odor, be fragrant.’”—Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament, edited by R. L. Harris, 1980, Vol. 2, p. 586.

    Several fruits have been suggested in place of the apple, including the orange, the citron, the quince, and the apricot. The main objection raised to the apple is that the hot, dry climate of most of Palestine is unfavorable to apple culture. However, the related Arabic word tuffah primarily means “apple,” and it is notable that the Hebrew place-names Tappuah and Beth-tappuah (probably so named because of the prevalence of this fruit in their vicinity) have been preserved in their Arabic equivalents by the use of this word. (Jos 12:17; 15:34, 53; 16:8; 17:8) These places were not in the lowlands but in the hill country, where the climate is generally somewhat moderated. Additionally, the possibility of some climatic variations in the past cannot be completely ruled out. Apple trees do grow in Israel today and thus seem to fit the Bible description satisfactorily. William Thomson, who spent many years in Syria and Palestine in the past century, even reported finding apple orchards in the area of Ashkelon on the Plains of Philistia.—The Land and the Book, revised by J. Grande, 1910, pp. 545, 546.

    The apple tree (Pyrus malus) is mentioned mainly in The Song of Solomon, where the expressions of love by the Shulammite’s shepherd companion are likened to the pleasant shade of the apple tree and the sweetness of its fruit. (Ca 2:3, 5) In turn, he compares her breath to the fragrance of apples. (Ca 7:8; see also 8:5.) In the Proverbs (25:11) appropriate, opportune speech is likened to “apples of gold in silver carvings.” The only other reference to the apple is at Joel 1:12. The common tradition as to the apple’s being the forbidden fruit of Eden is without any Scriptural basis whatsoever. Similarly, the expression “apple of the eye” is found in the King James Version (Ps 17:8; Pr 7:2; and others) but is not a Hebrew expression, the literal translation being “the pupil of [one’s] eyeball.”

    Source(s): my bible study with Jehovahs Witnesses
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  • 1 decade ago

    The bible doesn't state anywhere what the fruit was that Eve ate. Many early Christians made it out to be the apple because the apple was sacred to many pagan religions. If you slice an apple (any apple) splitting the top and bottom the core and seeds form a pentacle. The Early Christians demonized this symbol because it was and is a big pagan symbol and they hate competition.

    Blessed Be )O(

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  • Jeff D
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    No. First, the story is mythical. Second, in the Near East and fertile crescent area of Mesopotamia, apples were not a native fruit tree.

    But somewhere along the way, the notion arose that the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil had been an apple. And so in botanical taxonomy, apple trees are in the genus "Malus" (from the Latin for "evil").

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  • 1 decade ago

    It's just a metaphorical apple, the generic fruit for a metaphorical phrase "forbidden fruit" (sin).

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It only says fruit, man has inferred it was an apple, but since an apple never gave me any wisdom, I would doubt it.

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  • 1 decade ago

    No. It was one forbidden tree. It was different, and special. It was not a fruit we currently have. The significant point was that she did what she was told not to do. She chose to disobey.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Maybe yes, maybe not - who cares!

    The fact remains - women are less intimidated than men and more intelligent too.

    Think about that: who is historically the head of the family - men.

    Then who is the neck of it - women.

    So... Where the neck turns - the head goes - apple or no apple.

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  • 1 decade ago

    There are two trees in the garden. These two trees have more than a literal meaning. We are told that The tree of knowledge of good and evil is forbidden.

    The day Adam eats of it he will surely die.

    The tree of life is also in the midst of the garden if they eat of it they will live forever.

    These two trees are obviously more than trees.

    What is the knowledge of good and evil?

    Where could a man gain knowledge of good and evil?

    We get our knowledge of good and evil from God.

    The law that God sent down to Moses is the knowledge of good and evil.

    Why would God's righteous law kill man?

    Because man could not live up to God's righteousness.

    It is also the reason there was a tree in the midst of the garden called the tree of life.

    This is God's mercy.

    This story Moses tells is of he two natures of God his righteousness and his mercy.

    It is the story of man and his fall from God's glory and God's plan of salvation.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It's not specified in the mythology, but it's usually portrayed as such in art.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Definitely maybe.

    The Bible does not say what fruit it was.

    However, apples do grow in that region.

    Then again, so do pears and cumquats.

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