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Name 2 areas that became part of the united states as a result of the 'Manifest Destiny' policy.?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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    Manifest Destiny was the belief that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic seaboard to the Pacific Ocean; it has also been used to advocate for or justify other territorial acquisitions. Advocates of Manifest Destiny believed that expansion was not only good, but that it was obvious ("manifest") and certain ("destiny"). Originally a political catch phrase of the 19th century, "Manifest Destiny" eventually became a standard historical term, often used as a synonym for the expansion of the United States across the North American continent.

    The term was first used primarily by Jacksonian Democrats in the 1840s to promote the annexation of much of what is now the Western United States (the Oregon Territory, the Texas Annexation, and the Mexican Cession).

    According to the U.S. Coast Guard, "The Western Rivers System consists of the Mississippi, Ohio, Missouri, Illinois, Tennessee, Cumberland, Arkansas and White Rivers and their tributaries, and certain other rivers that flow towards the Gulf of Mexico" not the Sacramento and Columbia.

    The phrase was coined in 1845 by journalist John L. O'Sullivan, then an influential advocate for the Democratic Party. In an essay entitled "Annexation" published in the Democratic Review, O'Sullivan urged the United States to annex the Republic of Texas, not only because Texas desired this, but because it was our manifest destiny to overspread the continent allotted by Providence for the free development of our yearly multiplying millions[3]. Amid much controversy, Texas was annexed shortly thereafter, but O'Sullivan's first usage of the phrase "Manifest Destiny" attracted little attention.[4]

    O'Sullivan's second use of the phrase became extremely influential. On December 27, 1845 in his newspaper the New York Morning News, O'Sullivan addressed the ongoing boundary dispute with Great Britain in the Oregon Country. O'Sullivan argued that the United States had the right to claim "the whole of Oregon":

    With the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, which doubled the size of the United States, Jefferson set the stage for the continental expansion of the United States.

    During this time, the United States expanded to the Pacific Ocean—"from sea to shining sea"—largely defining the borders of the continental United States as they are today.[10]

    annexation of Mexican land north of the Rio Grande

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manifest_Destiny

    http://www.megaessays.com/essay_search/Manifest_De...

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  • 3 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Manifest Wealth And Success - http://Manifestation.ohfos.com/?sol
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  • 1 decade ago

    Any area that doesn't include the original colonies, that stretches from the Atlantic to the Pacific Oceans that is a part of the United States.

    Manifest Destiny was the belief that the United States was destined to expand from the Atlantic seaboard to the Pacific Ocean; so any of these would suffice.

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  • 4 years ago

    Apparently, you can not identify four both, however you'll pass on a prolonged diatribe towards the navy. I do not suppose we have now bombed four nations within the final two weeks, even though it is fair to suppose that we've got used explosive munitions in both Afghanistan or Iraq. Somehow I do not see how you'll equate protective our pursuits to imperialism.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The Louisiana Purchase

    the northern part of the country of Mexico

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  • 1 decade ago

    The Louisiana Purchase and the Gadsden Purchase.

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