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can a photon exist in a none moving state?

or does the light packet breakdown into moving and non moving particles? persay if a light packet or photon does not decay and is imortal more or less then the power of that energy stored in a balck hole must be beyond googly exponatial in its magnitude. how much matter does it take to retain a million lumins of light power and could a black hole be overloaded with light as to cause a release of its matter. as a black hole does not allways collect matter but is allways collecting light.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    The answer is yes. This may seem strange to you because most people are accustomed to think of "photons" as if they were classical particles that buzz around with the speed of light, but since they are really a quantum mechanical concept, it is important to think of them in that way: as certain states of the radiation field. Imagine a box with perfectly reflecting walls in which some light is "placed" so that it reflects back and forth between the walls. Let's further assume that all this light is of exactly one wavelength. You then have what is known as a standing wave inside the box, similar to a vibrating violin string. It represents a photon that is not moving, while being spread out over the size of the box. It can also represent more than one photon in the same state (wavelength or frequency and polarization), but that doesn't change the conclusion.

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  • 1 decade ago

    My understanding is that photons would be converted into pure energy and cease to have the wave-particle properties associated with a photon once it becomes integrated into a black hole's singularity. Light is a wave which, to all observers, appears to travel at light-speed (c). Alhough light has "particle" properties, it radiates in three dimensions as a spherical wave through vacuums as well as throguh translucent media, and its velocity cannot be dissipated (only its direction, frequency, and amplitude can be altered). So it is best thought of as a wave.

    I'm not an expert on the subject, but I don't believe the light collected by a black hole adds significantly to its mass. SUper black holes are thought to be at the center of all spiral and cluster galaxies, so you can imagine that, in being surrounded by billions of stars, its light intake would be colossal. Besides, as a mathematical consequence of the Lorentz Transformation, light cannot have mass because it travels at the speed of light, which would render it infinitely massive. Thus the concept of light having mass is only useful in specific applications but is not generally true, as we would assign mass to a true particle.

    You asked how much matter it would take to retain some amount of lumens. I believe once an event horizon is established, there's no limit as to how much light a black hole can retain. Any light that enters is not escaping, regardless of quantity. It doesn't max out and start overflowing with light; it's a one-way door with nothing but singularity on the other side. So the answer would be however much matter is required to form a black hole.

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  • 4 years ago

    Interesting question. I think a lot of the scientific advances would have come from Europe anyway since most of the US are descended from European colonists. Maybe the innovations would not have happened as quickly though since Europe was economically crippled after the first world war. America's intervention in the wars and its advocacy for self determination greatly helped speed up the efforts to secure peace in Europe. However other than that I don't think the world would be in a much worse state than it is at the moment. Human rights movement would have went on regardless and Great Britain in particular was a big hotspot for Asian and African immigration. In fact the UK is a far more multicultural society today than the US.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The answer to this question is a little beyond my understanding but light can be both slowed and stopped without destroying the photons. See the reference for more information.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No, photons always move-- its a stream of energy packets, that behave as a wave, because light is electromagnetic radiation.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Pardon me but i didnt understand any of the second part of the question........... buttt a photon never stops because it is always moving particle. if photon stops light stops then u can imagine how life would be............... everything would stop.........

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  • 1 decade ago

    No, a photon is constantly moving. It's full of energy, so it doesn't stop.

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