Do you care about the holocaust?

No one seems to care anymore, especially this generation. My sister went to the holocaust museum in washington d.c. recently and when she was in a part of it, it was suppose to be very quiet because you were suppose to be remembering the innocent lost lives, but a group of high schoolers were joking around, laughing and being very loud. I can't believe it. I know it happened a while ago, but it's still a major part in history. So I'm trying to find out if anyone cares anymore.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    I survived the Holocaust when I was a teenager. The people who first reared me(childless aunt and uncle) were victims of the Holocaust as I would have been also if I had stayed with them. I was whisked away to rejoign my biological parents at the age 6. My actual parents had gone from Germany to Belgium shortly after my birth They thought Hitler (at the time mn many Germans I am told share the view of my father that Hitler would not be able to govern, of course they did not know that he would turn a democracy into a dictatorship, eliminating all opposition parties . i survived with my family , moving each 6 month, not attending school, under the name of Lejeune, through the Southeast Belgian rural areas later on the margin what became known as "the Battle of the Bulge." You may see me with my late foster parents at the age of 4 `1/1 years pictured with them on the page of the Yahoo! Remember_The_Holocaust group. You ought to join if you are seriously interested (go to the page and click on join)as it is very informative on all facets of the tragedy as wellas human rights and toleranceeducation. It has over 40 pages of links to sites that deal with those topics. in addition, it is very active with 179 members worldwide. Here is the description:What can we, as humans,possibly do for the victims of the Holocaust?

    We can remember by promoting tolerance and human rights. The group's primary purpose is educational,totally informative , even instructive Learn about the history of the Holocaust. Ask any questions you may have, participate , and often messages related to the Holocaust will be posted Posted material is for educational purpose for the only private use of the members. In addition, the moderator proposes a site of the week. You are encouraged to visit our comprehensive list of links which feature various facets of The Holocaust, Genocide Watch, Human Rights and Tolerance education. All members of Yahoo groups are expected to abide by Yahoo 's "Terms of Service . We are a collegial thinking group. The moderator survived The Holocaust as a teenager. (The group's membership is global from all 5 continents and encompasses varied backgrounds ,religions, etc., and ranging from students to esteemed scholars.)

    The picture taken in 1937 is of the moderator then at age 4 1 / 2 years old with his foster parents , a childless aunt and uncle,who had reared him from a year old until the age of almost six years old. In 1938, he was whisked away from Wehen/Wiesbaden, Germany to Verviers, Belgium, where his parents moved in 1933. His aunt and uncle became Holocaust victims.

    Source(s): What can we, as humans,possibly do for the victims of the Holocaust? We can remember by promoting tolerance and human rights. The group's primary purpose is educational,totally informative , even instructive Learn about the history of the Holocaust. Ask any questions you may have, participate , and often messages related to the Holocaust will be posted Posted material is for educational purpose for the only private use of the members. In addition, the moderator proposes a site of the week. You are encouraged to visit our comprehensive list of links which feature various facets of The Holocaust, Genocide Watch, Human Rights and Tolerance education. All members of Yahoo groups are expected to abide by Yahoo 's "Terms of Service . We are a collegial thinking group. The moderator survived The Holocaust as a teenager. (The group's membership is global from all 5 continents and encompasses varied backgrounds ,religions, etc., and ranging from students to esteemed scholars.) The picture taken in 1937 is of the moderator then at age 4 1 / 2 years old with his foster parents , a childless aunt and uncle,who had reared him from a year old until the age of almost six years old. In 1938, he was whisked away from Wehen/Wiesbaden, Germany to Verviers, Belgium, where his parents moved in 1933. His aunt and uncle became Holocaust victims.
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    A lot of people take the attitude that it's 'history' and that we Jews should 'move on'. They seem to forget that it was only a mere 63 years ago that Jews were being exterminated in their millions in the Holocaust. Not even 100 years ago!

    The Holocaust decimated European Jewry. When it was over, HALF THE JEWS ON THIS PLANET had been murdered. Six million women, children and men.

    We as Jews will ALWAYS care, we will never forget. And we will never allow anything like it to happen again.

    NEVER AGAIN. This is the silent promise that nearly all Jews make to themselves at some time in their life.

    And for those that claim 'there's no anti semitism any longer' - you are talking utter rubbish. Here in the UK, the number of physical assaults on Jews is so high now that two NON Jewish politicians have had to launch a parliamentary enquiry.

    In the city of Manchester, Jews now have a police escort when walking to synagogue - because of the sheer number of physical attacks on them over the past year. And Jewish schools are having to add bomb-proof glass to all their windows.

    It's really quite irrational when NON Jews insist that Jews aren't experiencing racism any longer - how the hell do they know? Are THEY ever going to be in the firing line of anti semitism? NO THEY AREN'T!

    One only has to read any Jewish newspaper to see that across Europe and beyond, Jews are once again experiencing racism.

    And that's without even mentioning Israel, which is NOT about land. If it was, why didn't the 'Palestinians' demand their own state before 1967? Prior to then, they were stuck in refugee camps by Jordan and Egypt and they never uttered a word of complaint. Jordan IS a PALESTINIAN ARAB state - it takes up 80% of what was the REGION of Palestine.

    Israel = 0.01% of the Middle East

    But I digress. Jews still care about the Holocaust. We will always do our utmost to ensure that our lost are remembered. That they are never forgotten.

    Never Again.

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  • Domino
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    I still care.

    It was a dark time. Something that I got to experience by walking through the Berlin Wall while it was still up as a kid and something that was spoken about in my 6th grade class. A lady that had been in it talked about how she'd been picked on for being Jewish and some of the stuff that had happened to her family before her.

    People still care, but just like some if not many have moved on past the 9/11 attacks. We as a human try to remember the good not the bad it seems. Though if we don't remember the lessons from before we won't know where not to go next time history tries to repeat itself.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes. Very much.

    Just because millions died in a time that was not our does not mean their lives were any less important.

    We must learn from the holocaust so that we never repeat it.

    I once joked and laughed at it until the school showed us a film the Nazis took themselves of lampshades and wallets made from human skin. All the laughter died when we saw that.

    Maybe they are just too immature to get it or maybe they do get it and its too scary to think about.

    We have to study and understand it so that it can NEVER be repeated.

    I would say that class needs a little extra instruction to make it real. Watch the movie my class did.

    I can't believe the teacher didn't shut them up. That was rude.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I do ... my grandparents were forced to flee Denmark because of the Nazis. Luckily, they were able to get across to Sweden before the Nazis rounded up all the Jews they could find in Denmark. Some of my grandparent's relatives were not so lucky. My grandfather lost three cousins to German concentration camps ... and all just because they happened to be Jewish.

    For those who think the Jews are no longer persecuted you have no idea what you are talking about. You would not believe the levels of anti-semitism I have witnessed in my life and how widespread those sentiments are among the general populations of virtually every country in the world. It was because of these common prejudices Hitler was able to do what he did; people generally believed that Jews were behind everything that was wrong in their lives; that there was a worldwide conspiracy of Jews to control politics, the media, and finances; that Jews secretly worship the devil, etc ... The Holocaust is important because IT COULD HAPPEN AGAIN if we're not careful. And thats not necessarily to say it could happen to the Jews again, but any minority group -- that is why it is important. History teaches us lessons that enable us to grow out of our own petty biases and bigotry to ensure we do not repeat the very worst in human nature, but progress towards the very best we can be.

    It is still not an easy thing to be Jewish ... anti-semitism is still rather ubiquitous not only in Europe, but in countries like the United States as well. For instance, I had a potential employer once, when he discovered I was of Jewish ancestry, say directly to my face, "I would never hire a damn dirty jew ..."

    Everyone should care about such reckless and indiscriminate hatred, especially when it resulted in the wholesale cashiering of millions of innocent people (not just Jews, but homosexuals, Jehovas Witnesses, gypsies, etc ...). The Holocaust is a lesson of what happens when hatred becomes institutionalized, and thinking of ourselves as superior to others.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I care when I see my mom's friend who survived the concentration camps as a little girl, who lost almost her whole family and even now, on her arm is the tattooed number as if she were no more than a commodity or farm animal. I care because I think of my husband's cousin's dad who lived through the concentration camps and escaped and started a new free life in Canada. I care because I saw the enormous pile of shoes that represented the missing children at the Holocaust Museum in Washington D.C. I care because of the people that didn't, and turned a blind eye to the atrocities being committed right in front of them. I care because it is happening again- in Darfur- and if we dont' snap out of our lethargic Entertainment Tonight obsessed comas- it will happen perhaps even in our own country.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I do, and I think that is the nature of high school students. Put them in a group, in a serious situation, and you are bound to find them acting that way because they are uncomfortable and that's how teenagers deal with that much discomfort.

    I must tell you, I had a similar experience. I was at one of the Camps in Germany many years ago, and there was a family there, and thier two children were running around barefoot and clapping their flip-flops and making a disturbance, totally ruining it for me. I sort of signaled to them to settle down, and their father came over and loudly dressed ME down. I pretended not to understand German, and he began yelling at me in English. It was very disturbing, not only that the kids were so disrespectful of the whole situation, but that their father completely backed them up on the disturbing behavior, then indulged himself, as well.

    The experience changed me, and I feel like one of the souls from the camp came away with me, and stays with me all the time. I feel it, him, her, sometimes.

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  • Jed
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Ever heard of nervous laughter? While it's possible that is what occurred, I know that some may not be able to comprehend the gravity of the Holocaust.

    If we cannot learn from the past, we will be doomed to repeat it.

    This should never again happen, where innocents are slaughtered as so many were.

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  • Irish
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Yes I do care. Never in the History of Mankind has evil flourished with absolutely no restraints until the very end. It is so horrific that I sometimes shudder just thinking about it.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    yes i care what happened was disgusting as usual religion was at the fore front jews are still being persecuted but you mention other religion of peopl who wear beards and hat thats not allowed you are told that you are racist i lived for years in a jewish area most of my life a would rather live with them than the other lot who say the hollocaust did not happen

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