Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Pregnancy & ParentingPregnancy · 1 decade ago

Dry Birth?

When I was pregnant I had a friend who told me that she went through a dry birth. She said I would not want one, and so when my H2O breaks to not wait around....... go to the ER. I told her I would. When I asked my mom about dry births she said there is no such thing as a dry birth. I think there is, but I am unsure.

Is it real, and has anyone had one?

Update:

Never mind I actually found it - "Dry birth" is really a misnomer because your body continues to make amniotic fluid. This term probably originated in the days of granny and traditional midwifery. Fluid is constantly produced -- about a cup an hour.

It is what was thought to be when all of your H20 flushes out, and there is no "wettness" there during the time you push the baby out. It is not true. Thanks anyway!

Update 2:

Cool that is the same website I went to. I do not know how I got to it. Thanks to all!

9 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
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    "Dry birth" is really a misnomer because your body continues to make amniotic fluid. This term probably originated in the days of granny and traditional midwifery. Fluid is constantly produced -- about a cup an hour. Even if there is no fluid release with the birth, there is usually fluid behind the baby.

    The amniotic fluid probably serves no real lubricative function, but absence or low levels of fluid is a cause for concern for other reasons.

    Oligohydramnios, or too little fluid, is common in the postdate pregnancy. It can reflect the fetus' diminished production of urine and the deterioration of the fetal-maternal circulation.

    In postdate pregnancy, the risk of fetal jeopardy is higher from placental insufficiency and also from the higher risk of passage of meconium. When there is not much fluid, the meconium becomes very particulate and thick. Aspiration into the baby's lungs before and after birth is a major risk.

    Because fluid volume does diminish after term, instillation of warm saline can be done if this lack of fluid seems to be causing distress in labor or if the baby has passed meconium and the midwife or doctor feels that it would be helpful to try to dilute it. This procedure is called "amnioinfusion" and it can be very beneficial.

  • 1 decade ago

    "Dry birth" is really a misnomer because your body continues to make amniotic fluid. Fluid is constantly produced -- about a cup an hour. Even if there is no fluid release with the birth, there is usually fluid behind the baby.

    The amniotic fluid probably serves no real lubricative function, but absence or low levels of fluid is a cause for concern for other reasons.

    Source(s): RN L&D
  • 1 decade ago

    No birth is literally 'dry'. There's always a bit of water there. It hurts a LOT more the 'drier' your birth canal is. That's why you should never let them break your waters!!! It provides a great cushion for the baby to come down the birth canal, which is beneficial to both the baby and you! If your water spontaneously breaks.. DON'T rush right into the ER. That's the last thing you want to do. It's going to take as long as it's going to take no matter where you are... and if you go in, the first thing they'll do is 'check' your cervix.... and once your waters are broken, you are at higher risk of infection and the last thing you need is someone sticking their hand up there!!! The longer you stay home during labor, the better your chances of avoiding an infection. The waters will leak pretty much continuously, so you won't 'run out' of water or anything... so it makes no sense to rush in to the hospital. You won't dry up.

  • 1 decade ago

    A "dry birth" is what they used to call a birth in which the bag of waters (amniotic sac) breaks early in labor, as it does about ten percent of the time. It certainly is misnamed because even when this happens, the woman's body continues to make a fresh supply of amniotic fluid right up until the baby is born.

    For most women whose water breaks early in labor, contractions start on their own within a few hours and labor progresses normally.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Unless she means a natural one with no pain meds, I have never heard such a thing. I in my opinion would prefer a dry birth (if that's what it means) over one with pain drugs.

    Better ask her and let the rest of us know what it is for sure.

  • 1 decade ago

    Ive never had one..this is my first baby..but i have heard about dry birth and i heard it was pain full...

    i was also told that it would be a good idea to go to the hospital after my water breaks to prevent it...

    then on the other hand Ive heard that you dint have to go to the hospital right away after Ur water breaks...

  • 1 decade ago

    I have heard that it is not a thing called dry birth the fluid replaces it self.

  • Lily18
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    http://health.yahoo.com/experts/pregnancy/3196/myt...

    read that it will explain what it means.

    I have not known anyone to have had it happen.

  • 1 decade ago

    never heard of it

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