On a digital piano, is there a signifanct(noticeable) difference between 32 bit and 64 bit polyphony?

Is the difference between 32 and 64 bit noticeable? Does 64 bit sound more like a real piano when compared to 32-bit. I am a beginner and thinking of buying my first digital piano. The piano I liked(Yamaha YPG625) only has 32-bit. Please advise.

Is there any song that can be played only with 64 bit and not 32 bit?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Not any noticible difference. For a beginner a 32 bit will be fine.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Well, heres the deal. If you are playing the keyboard, surely you can not play much more than say, 12 notes at a time (two with each thumb). But that fact is, any song that you may play using the pedal, 32 voice would fill up quite rapidly and you may notice some cutting out of differnt sounds. This is especially evident when you play with any mixed sounds in the keyboard. This would actually use 2 per note. This gets trickey. It really depends on how much screwing around you like to do. If you plan on this as a long term investment, its will be worth the extra to go with a 64 voice. The piano sounds though depends on the brand and quality of the board. Can't go wrong with roland and kurzweil, but shop around.

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  • Saul
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    All i've ever heard about polyphony is that the more you have, in general, the more realistic it's going to sound. I recommend basing your consideration on price and sound vs what could potentially just be more of a gimmick for you.

    16-bit audio represents the spectrum of what we as humans can hear. However, as soon as we start manipulating 16-bit sounds digitally we begin to have unnatural sounds... every rounding error is within that spectrum of sound, which means that if we have good enough ears, we can hear every bit that went wrong in the digital computation process, whether that process is reverb, compression, whatever.

    So, technology bumped up to 24-bit recording. The level of detail is so fine that you can't hear the most subtle parts of the sounds now..... those extra 8 bits (of "depth" as the pros call it) mean that you can have up to 8 bits deep of rounding errors, smearing, or even just extra detail. This improves the "audible" portion of the 16 bits we do hear.

    There is no 64-bit recording. There isn't even 32-bit recording. You can only hear 16-bits worth of sound...

    Saul

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It's usually referred to as "note" polyphony, as in 32-note or 64-note.

    If that's the case here and you're just mis-reading it as "bit", then polyphony refers to how many notes the keyboard can generate at a time. Since few pianists play more than 32 notes at once (he he, really it's closer to 10, right?) then the only time 64 will make a difference is if you're playing incredibly rapid passages and you want the tones to fade without getting cut off.

    Now, if it's 32-bit vs. 64-bit tone generation, then it will matter somewhat more, since the greater the number of bits devoted to producing each note, the more realistic the tone, attack, and fade can be.

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  • 1 decade ago

    32 will be fine since you're a beginner. What you need to look for more importantly is a keyboard that is "touch sensitive" and has weighted keys. These things are important because they more closely mimic the feel of a real piano which is very important in the learning process.

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