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What do Italian children call their parents?

I'm writing a history paper where I have to write from the perspective of a child living in New York in the early 20th century. Right now I've only made up a little back story to my character. He's an 11-year-old boy, lives with his Italian immigrant parents, 2 sisters, and 3 younger brothers.

What do Italian children usually call their parents? Mama, papa, ma, pa, etc.? How about aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc.? I also need a name, so what are some common Italian surnames as well as first names? What are common homemade dishes? Any other basics I need to know?

Update:

kobefor3, you've been reported. I happen to know that that word is an ethnic slur derogatory to Italians

12 Answers

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  • Mari76
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Hi, I live in Italy. Well, mom is mamma and dad is papà. Although, I've heard some Italians call their parents ma and pa or mammina and papi (papino) which is basically mommy and daddy, but usually little kids say this. In Tuscany, dad is babbo. Aunts is zie and uncles is zii, if you are talking about both together you just say zii. Grandparents is nonni (nonna is grandma and nonno is grandpa). Some common names are Antonio, Francesco, Giovanni, Roberto, Giovanna, Maria, Sofia, Elisa, etc. Some common surnames are Rossi, Bianchi, Esposito, Manfredini, ecc. Some dishes could be lasagna or oven-baked pasta (pasta al forno), minestrone (vegetable soup usually served with small pasta or rice), pollo al forno con patate (oven-baked chicken with roasted potatoes), spaghetti col pomodoro (spaghetti with tomato sauce), etc. The type of food and the name depends on what region they are from.

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  • 3 years ago

    Italian Word For Father

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  • biro
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Father In Italian

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What do Italian children call their parents?

    I'm writing a history paper where I have to write from the perspective of a child living in New York in the early 20th century. Right now I've only made up a little back story to my character. He's an 11-year-old boy, lives with his Italian immigrant parents, 2 sisters, and 3 younger...

    Source(s): italian children call parents: https://tr.im/oD7ip
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    My dad's father was born in Italy, my grandmother was born in the USA but her parents were Italian immigrants, my dad called his mom-- mom, and his dad daddy... he still calls his dad daddy (my dad's in his mid 60s and my grandpa's been dead for 25 years) lol.

    Grandma and Grandpa, aunt and uncle. For the most part my grandparents tried to Americanize their children. First names typically go like this: for boys the oldest son is named after the fathers father, second son after the mothers father, third son after the father's oldest brother, and so on down the line-- the same thing for girls after the fathers mother, mother's mother, father's sister, mother's sister.As for names- especially in my family if you say the name 'Joe' 20 people look at you, the Italian form of Joe is Giuseppe-- Rose (Rosa), Pauline, Antonina (Lena), and Peter (Pietro), and Bill (Vito)are also popular names. My grandparents made sauce every year-- they had a garden in their backyard (very common at the turn of the century) they made 'basta gilagia (sp?) that's how it's said, in English it's spaghetti and garlic, they also made canoli's all the time-- my grandma even made her own spaghetti. Italian Americans are typically very religious people (especially first and second generation Italian Americans). As for common last names-- I know a lot of Morabito's (pronounced mora-beat-o in English and Mo-ra-be-to in Italian) that are not related.

    Source(s): Italian-American
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  • i don't know a whole lot, but noni(pronounced no-knee) is grandma. italian dishes should be obvious, but in case they aren't, they are ziti, lasagna(can't spell it), penne, chicken parmasean(spelt wrong too) among many other. the big italian desert is canoli. if your story is around easter, an easter italian dish is fretad(a){sometimes its called fretad, sometimes fretada}. a very popular phrase for italians is munja(which means eat)

    Source(s): im italian, but not a pureblood
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  • Brenda
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Mamma, papa', zia (aunt), zio (uncle), nonna (grandmother), nonno (grandfather). For a name, look on a map of southern Italy and pick up the name of any town that you think easy to pronounce. They arrived to Ellis Island and they gave them the name of the town they're from. Homemade dishes for poor people... pasta with tomato sauce I'd say! The could be in the business of importing goods from Italy.

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  • 4 years ago

    That's a good question

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  • paul
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    I often end up writing the same question on other sites

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  • 1 decade ago
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