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Andrew Jackson v. Henry Clay- Information?

I need to make a speech (US History) Comparing and contrasting Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson, in broad areas.

Here are a few

-National Power

-Slaves

-Clay on the Indian Removal Act

-Clay on the National Bank

Any ideas for categories/ information, anyone?

3 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The arts of power and it's minions are the same in all countries and in all ages. It marks it's victim; denounces it; and excites the public odium and the public hatred, to conceal it's own abuses and encroachments. ( Henry Clay, March 14, 1834 )

    Andrew Jackson

    It is to be regretted that the rich and powerful too often bend the acts of government to their selfish purposes… Everyman is equally entitled to protection under by the law; but when the laws undertake to add… artificial distinctions, grant titles, gratuities and exclusive privileges, to make the rich richer and the potent more powerful, the humble members of society- the farmers, mechanics and laborers-who have neither the time nor the means of securing like favors to themselves, have a right to complain of the injustice of their government. Andrew Jackson ( 7/10/1832)

    Andrew Jackson vs. Henry Clay Democracy and Development in Antebellum America

    Harry L. Watson

    Trumpeting the virtues of popular democracy, expanding the powers of the chief executive, and presiding over an era in which Americans learned to adhere to national political parties without apology, Andrew Jackson changed the way Americans thought about government and politics. Few presidents have been so thoroughly identified with their respective eras as Jackson: One rarely encounters references to "Hayesian America" or "the age of Fillmore." In a number of ways, however, the federal policies promoted by Henry Clay, an unsuccessful presidential aspirant and nemesis of Jackson, proved just as prescient of future developments in the United States. Later administrations would translate components of Clay’s proposed "American System" into policy; the sale of public lands to generate revenue for "internal improvements" is one example. Jackson and Clay, therefore, both sponsored initiatives that would influence America’s future, yet contemporaries viewed their respective ideas as diametrically opposed.

    In Andrew Jackson vs. Henry Clay, Harry L. Watson combines an introductory essay with a substantial collection of documents to clarify key issues contested by the first generation of post–Revolutionary era political leaders. Watson also demonstrates that the passion with which Jackson’s supporters and opponents argued over questions of banking and tariff policy—a vehemence that can bewilder students—was well founded: Often, these arguments came down to first principles.

    Watson notes that both Jackson and Clay hoped to maintain and enhance the freedoms inherited from the Revolutionary era. How did their respective interpretations of the Revolutionary legacy differ? From their survey texts, students will have learned of the political acrimony between Federalists and Democratic-Republicans and of the Federalist decline after 1800. Why did the subsequent Era of Good Feelings seem to be a victory for American republicanism? Did this represent the wholesale abandonment of Federalist goals for economic development? What social and economic changes allowed political antagonism between advocates of democracy and proponents of development to flare up again in the 1820s? Students should examine these issues to understand the impact of the Market Revolution, especially, on the interpretation of political principles and on partisan formation and to explore the tensions between democracy and development.

    Did Jacksonian Democrats see the increasingly complex economic conditions that followed the establishment of a market economy as a threat to personal freedom? Why did Jackson himself often claim that the greatest threat to democracy emanated from a "moneyed aristocracy"? Can students identify the aspects of Clay’s proposals and views that would likely draw Jackson’s fire? For insight into Clay’s desire to make the federal government a more active force in generating economic development, readers can analyze the description of the "American System" he delivered to Congress in 1832. On a more personal note, students should read Clay’s explanation for having supported John Quincy Adams’s election to the presidency when the decision for the close campaign of 1824 fell to the House of Representatives: What does Clay’s negative reference to Jackson as a "military chieftain" reveal about the potential dangers of popular democracy? Why did Jackson supporters respond so bitterly to the election of Adams, and what methods did they use to vindicate themselves in time for the 1828 election? Finally, why was Jackson so popular, and to what extent did a presidential candidate’s popularity matter in previous elections?

    Henry Clay feared that popular democracy might degenerate into demagoguery. Do the documents pertaining to the "bank war" of Jackson’s second term, his stance toward Indian removal, and his handling of the nullification crisis seem to justify Clay’s fears? As a classroom exercise, students can be divided into separate groups to argue either Jackson’s or Clay’s position on one of these issues. However, students should be aware of the boundaries Jacksonians drew around popular democracy. Survey texts describe other social developments of the period, including the rise of reform movements, the most sensitive of which was abolitionism. How did the essentially class-based politics of the era address the issue of slavery—or did it? As the title of Watson’s volume suggests, Andrew Jackson and Henry Clay offered opposing visions for American progress; by examining Jackson’s and Clay’s attitudes toward the maintenance and expansion of the southern slave system, students may also consider what views these two rivals held in common.

    Source(s): indian removal act info at http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/dwe/16338.htm
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  • 3 years ago

    Andrew Jackson Vs Henry Clay

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Andrew Jackson v. Henry Clay- Information?

    I need to make a speech (US History) Comparing and contrasting Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson, in broad areas.

    Here are a few

    -National Power

    -Slaves

    -Clay on the Indian Removal Act

    -Clay on the National Bank

    Any ideas for categories/ information, anyone?

    Source(s): andrew jackson henry clay information: https://tinyurl.im/v5Nhc
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