crzycoookies asked in PetsFish · 1 decade ago

Getting fed up with aquarium.. Anyone have any advice?

I have an african clawed froglet. Right now I'm keeping him in a small 1 gall. tank until he gets a little bigger. I know ACFs are very dirty animals, but this is crazy.. Every day I have to do a 100% water change, which means moving the frog to a temp. enclosure, rinsing out the sand MANY times, etc. I'm not going to spend any money on a filter for this aquarium, which Im only going to be using for the next week or two anyways. Is there anything I can do to help keep it a little cleaner, longer?

Update:

I am switching him over to a 30 gall(with filter) in a few weeks, I'm just looking for some advice as to what I can do right now.

Update 2:

I'm perfectly fine with cleaning it every day, I'm just worried about the stress that it puts on the frog.. And as for gravel, I can't use it with ACFs, they could accidently eat it and get their intestines blocked. I have, however, thought of removing the sand and using a bare bottom tank for now. Will that help?

Update 3:

He doesn't need moved to a bigger tank NOW, he is barely even 1 inch SNVL. This tank is more than big enough for him, for now. To the people who are being rude, I doubt you've even owned a ACF, or even know what it looks like. I've done hours of research on this frog(obviously not so much keeping aquariums) and I'm pretty sure I know what I'm doing with the frog, I just need aquarium help. If there's nothing I can do until it gets moved to a bigger tank, I'm fine with that, but there's no need to be rude.

10 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Hi. I had a look at some frog specialist sites - I can see why you are being so vigilent with the water quality.

    What you are looking for is obviously only a temporary solution.

    I would go for a bare tank (no substrate) with a terra cotta pot on its side as a hiding place. The strategy is therefore lots of water change rather than trying for biological filtration - which you do not have time to set up anyway if your new aquarium will come on line in a few weeks.

    You will still have to change the water but will be much faster each time.

    Go for a floating pellet food until your new tank is cycled. Live food is obviously better for the critter in the long term but frozen meat is obviously a real pollution threat in stagnant water.

    Try a large, loosely packed net bag of carbon sitting in the tank. This is obviously not as effective outside of a filter but will help even out your ammonia in the short time. (There are even better products "ion exchange resins" - such as the one made by seachem) however cost about $aud 25 for 20 grams so you may not wish to spend the money.

    When your new tank does arrive, I would keep kermit in his current tank for at least two weeks - put your "used" water in the new one to get the nitrogen cycle happening. (google "fishless cycling") In the early stages most of the bacteria are free in the water (they have not yet formed biofilms on the substrate and filter media) so the kind of water changes you need with your critter in there will dump a lot of bacteria each time.

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  • 1 decade ago

    WOW! Well one suggestion is to go ahead and buy the filter or air pump and use gravel...this way when you transfer him over you can reuse as a betta tank.

    If not wanting to go that route...my only suggestion would be to use gravel and use a small gravel cleaner. This would eliminate rinsing out the sand over and over...to once a week with the gravel cleaned by hand throughly or three times a week with the gravel cleaner. With the Gravel Cleaner you could probably make the water changes only to 25% to 50% every third day also with small gravel cleaner.

    That's just a guess...but seems like it might help.

    Other than that I cant really think of any other ideas to help resolve your issue.

    Hope someone else has a better idea.

    Best of Luck!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The sand is causing the majority of your issues. I would switch to larger pebbles at this point since you are correct not to use standard gravel. I bought some pebbles for a betta tank once just because I liked the way they looked. They were called Goshiki. These are small enough to use as a base yet large enough that he will never be able to get them in his mouth. Your other alternative would be to use the bio ceramic media that BioOrbs use (it is sold separately) as gravel. These look like moon rocks are are used as gravel in the BiOrbs and would not be large enough for him to get in his mouth.

    Refrain from cleaning it everyday, even if it looks bad. You are stressing him out and you're destroying any beneficial bacteria you're growing. You might not mind being that you aren't planning on continuing that tank but he does need some to control the ammonia levels in the tank he is in and you could also use this to seed the new tank with.

    Good luck : )

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  • 1 decade ago

    Take the sand out. That'll at least ride yourself of the headache of cleaning that. And maybe trying to feed it a little less for the time being to reduce waist. Its tough to say with the circumstances. Just make sure you condition the water properly before putting it back in the tank. The less you clean the tank the better it is. That's probably about it of things you can do to try to keep your frog and yourself from getting stressed out. lol. Best of luck.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The only thing I can think of is getting gravel instead of sand. It's a lot easier to clean. Unless the frog needs sand. I don't care/know about frogs so this might be a moot point.

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  • 1 decade ago

    with the frog pet a tortoise/turtle keep in the same tank. turtle will eat all the dirty things of the pond and will help u without any expenses.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    get something bigger

    i would suggest getting a bigger tank for it and a filter

    it will help A LOT

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  • 1 decade ago

    Don't wash everything. they need to build up the beneficial bacteria in the sand, so by washing it thoroughly every day, your effectively keeping him in a high ammonium environment.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Move it to biger charcoal filtered tank NOW!

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  • 1 decade ago

    Spend less time griping, and more time doing....

    Makes it easier to get motivated, get it done, and wastes less mental energy in the long run....you'll be happier for it

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