Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceTaxesUnited States · 1 decade ago

I've been claiming 0 on my W-4 for the last few years and continue to owe on my taxes, any suggestions?

I am married, we do not own a home and try to deduct as much as we are able to. It's very frustrating, because usually when we do just my husband's taxes we get a refund, add my into the equation and we owe. I'm still paying off the irs from years past, help!

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    What has your husband been claiming on his W4? He may be claiming to many exemptions and while it doesn't hurt him with just his income your income puts him into a higher bracket and it hurts him.

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  • 1 decade ago

    How many allowances has your husband been claiming on his W-4? If you owe, he needs to reduce that by 1 for each $500 that you owe at filing time.

    If he is already claiming 0 then you both need to have additional taxes withheld from your pay. If you owe $1,000 then you each need to have an extra $10 per week withheld for Federal income taxes to avoid a debt next year.

    That said, if you are paying off the IRS and the amount you owe is small it might be best to leave things as they are! Keep in mind that your refund will be captured it you have one coming, so it might be best to owe a few $$$ at filing time to avoid having to deal with the hassle of the refund capture. Just a thought.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Figure out how much you owe each year, and fill out a new W-4 indicating that they take additional money out of each paycheck so that they annual total is about what you've been paying.

    You two can decide how much to take from each wage earner. If you owe $2,000 each year, and you make 30% of the income and your husband makes 70%, then he should have them withhold an additional $1,400 each year from his pay and you have them do an additional $700 from your pay. Divide the total by how many paychecks you get in a year and they'll take that much extra out of each.

    At the end of the year, you should pretty much break even.

    When you file as "married, filing jointly" you can't say that JUST MY HUSBANDS taxes give us a refund. It doesn't work that way. You are probably being paid much less than him and being taxed in a lower tax bracket.

    This happens with my wife and I every year. We both contribute to the total income, and that's what's taxed on. There is actually a form on the back of the W-4 which will tell you to fill out a bunch of income numbers for you and him and each other's withholding and it will suggest the additional amount you need to take out. It doesn't need to all come from YOUR paycheck (although it could). He needs to understand that.

    If he can't understand it, just tell him you'll quit working and he can foot all the bills, give you some spending money, and get the tax refund.

    It ain't easy to understand.

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  • 4 years ago

    No, you're not doing something incorrectly. The federal withholding on your paychecks are ESTIMATED only. If you're concerned about this happening again, the best thing to do is change the exemptions on your W-4 or ask your employer to take out additional withholding.

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  • 1 decade ago

    If you are claiming single 0 and your dh is not he should knock off some dependents. Have you tried to see what it would be if you filed married but separately? If your dh is not claiming single 0 then he should. If you are both already claiming single 0 then you should have extra money taken out. Add a couple of hundred to what you have to pay this year then divide by how many paychecks you get and have them take that much extra out of each paycheck.

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  • Judy
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    If you are both claiming zero and still end up owing, you need to request that an extra amount be withheld. You do this on line 6 of your W-4.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Line 7 on the W-4 allows you to instruct your employer to withhold a specific amount in addition to the normal withholding amount. You could also reduce the number of allowances your husband claims on HIS W-4. However, based on what you say in your question, it is likely you are computing your joint return incorrectly. Have a professional review your returns.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    On your W-4, you can specify an additional amount to be withheld from each paycheck (line 6). I'd suggest you use that to increase your withholding in the future.

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  • Gerald
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Fill out another W4 at your payroll clerk and put an $$$ amount on the form plus the "0" That is on the form and the boss will take out that amount... They do not know how much to take out in $$$ -- you tell them $$$

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