Latin help?

What are ways that latin are used in modern sosiety?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    - Today, Latin terminology is widely used, inter alia, in philosophy, medicine, biology, and law, in terms and abbreviations such as subpoena duces tecum and q.i.d. (quater in die: "four times a day"). The Latin terms are used in isolation, as technical terms.

    - Films such as Sebastiane and The Passion of the Christ have been made with dialogue in Latin.

    - The Pope delivers his written messages in Latin.

    - Many organizations today also have Latin mottos, such as "Semper Fidelis," or "Always Faithful," the motto of The United States Marine Corps.

    - Some universities still hold graduation ceremonies in Latin.

    - Contemporary musical compositions may integrate a chorus which sings in Latin for an aesthetic effect.

    - Spells in the Harry Potter series are sometimes made from Latin words. For example, accio, the Summoning Charm, is Latin for "I summon".

    Source(s): "Latin : Modern use of Latin" : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin#Modern_use_of_L...
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I found a minimal knowledge of Latin really indispensible when I was living in Europe. It helped me to decipher the languages in countries where I hadn't studied the language, like Portugal and Italy.

    Educated people very often know enough Latin to be able to pepper their language with higher level words that are latin-based.

    In addition to what others have already written.

    Also, understanding how to make Latin work for you, means you can make so many other things work that you probably don't even realize are based in the same skills. It's a good thing to know, even though it isn't a "spoken" language.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Some people still use it for chatting, especially in Europe, where there are so many languages.

    Schola is an example of a new social site where only Latin is used (It only started on 31 January '08).

    http://schola.ning.com/

  • 1 decade ago

    It is still the language of lawyers in many countries.

    http://latin-phrases.co.uk/terms/legal/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Latin_legal_...

    It is used in medicine

    http://www.lcc.edu/tutorial/study_tips/medical_ter...

    It is used in many areas of education: eg. maths -- reductio ad absurdum, quod erat demonstrandum. etc.; physics, where the abbreviations used on the valency table come from Latin.

    Latin words have contributed much to the English language generally http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/generalinfo/qt/...

    Latin is much used in music, because of ecclesiastical Latin.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin

    In Finland there is a radio station broadcasting the news in Latin http://www.yleradio1.fi/nuntii/audi/

    It can be used as a lingua franca among people who do not have any language in common.

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  • Everything that everybody said previous is true; also, I believe that Latin is still used in Vatican City.

  • 1 decade ago

    latin is a base language so alot of words in other languages stem from it.

  • 6 years ago

    In Romance languages, mostly for Italian, a lot of terms look like the original latin word(morior=to die, in italian is "morire", nascor=to born, in italian is "nascere", habere=to have, in italian is "avere" and so on). Also some english words have a latin origin such as "genius" comes from the latino "genius" or "hilarius" comes form the word "ilarius" or "egocentric"("ego" means "I" and "centrum" means "center", so an egocentric person put always itself in the center), or the word "parens", that is really similar to "parents". Nowdays alot of expressions are used in latin such like "carpe diem"="seize the day", "alter ego"= expression used in novels which means "another me", "mea culpa"="my fault", "talis pater, talis filius"= "same father, same son"(children sometimes look like their parents), "iter" which means "travel", or "step", "sponsor", which means "warrantor", "dulcis in fundo", which means "the sweet is in the end". As you see, very terms are nowdays used and come from latin in the normal life, or in a part of science, to classify plants or name the stars or galxies, or in legal language("ius soli"="rights of land).

    Source(s): I took latin and I'm italian.
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