Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentMilitary · 1 decade ago

Do these actions count as fraudulent enlistment?????

I have been told that fraudulent enlistment is where someone tries to get into the military and is deemed unsuccessful then tries to get in again under a different name or something like that. I ask this cause there are two individuals I am somewhat concerned about. One is a Specialist who once was in ROTC and was forbidden from contracting because he had Obsessive-compulsive disorder. He had meds and accomadations and dropped them afterwords but was still banned from contracting. When he graduated college, he enlisted and simply lied about his medical history/condition. The recruiters couldn't contact the cadre cause they were all reassigned by then. The other is a SSG who had Aspergers and was using both accommodations and meds in high school when he joined and lied about them both. Both of these men have done quite well in the army so I guess they can control it but do there actions count as fraudulent enlistment?

13 Answers

Relevance
  • looby
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Im no expert, the fact that they lied is wrong.

    there are rules for reasons, they dont want people with a medical history around guns.

    one day they may pop and they may shoot out a whole bunch of people.

    just my opinion.

  • 1 decade ago

    the simple answer is that they can be dishonorably discharged for a faugulent enlistment because they lied about these conditions and not to mention they can get legal problems to go along with the discharge. a fraudulent enlistment can be anything from lying about medical problems or having your middle inital be the wrong letter on your contract. if there was medical proof for these things then if it gets found out there is a possibility for lots of trouble but lets face the facts here, the military is low on people as it is and also they have been fine the whole time they have been in so more than likely its not even going to be looked at unless for some reason they give the military some reason to put the scope on them.

    Source(s): Source(s): Army MP Iraq Vet Former Recruiter "Wars aren't won by dying for your country. They're won by making the other son of a b*tch die for his."
  • 1 decade ago

    If the military finds out that they lied about having any medical conditions then yes, it could be considered fraudulent enlistment. When you fill out the paper work you have to sign that what you are saying is true and correct to the best of your knowledge. On that paper work they signed they ask you if there were any medical conditions that you need to tell them about. By not telling them about those conditions, they were falsifying a government document when they signed it. You will have an extremely hard time proving you did not know you had OCD or Aspergers while you were taking medication. For those reasons I would say yes.

    Liberty- So what you are saying is, it is ok to falsify government docunments and lie as long as you don't get caught. What happens when you do get caught? We can tell then Liberty said it was ok.

    Source(s): Former Air Force/ Current Coast Guard Member
  • 4 years ago

    You would never make it to fraudulent enlistment because you will go back to MEPS at least one more time(the day before you ship out) and that's when you will once again get naked and they will find/see the tattoo. Now the tattoo might not completely disqualify you from enlisting but it will need to get approval if it looks iffy and I know right now across the board with all services not that many waivers are being approved. I would say hold on until after you graduate your boot camp.

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It means when you lie or don't tell about a condition or something in your past that would normally disqualify you are or at least require a waiver. Seems like your boys may be in that area, but you going an telling on them will probably not do anything exept make you look like a nark. BUT, if their medical conditions is hurting their job performance in any way or the unit you can bring up specific examples of failures and then maybe mention that you heard the other stuff because the two were talking about it with some other people. Both are pretty serious conditions so they should smoke themselves out of hiding pretty soon with the chain of command. Unitl then I would leave it alone.

  • Bill
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    The situation will be handled if and when they go to a military doctor for treatment of these conditions. When you enlist and lie about previous conditions there is no way for the military and/or the FBI (who does background checks for the military) to talk to civilian doctors because of doctor/patient confidentiality. A military doctor is in the military and therefore is exempt from privilege. If the Army finds out the truth that is both an Army offense and a Federal offense. It would mean jail time and loss of pay and benefits. If you want to do something about it, instead of just complaining contact a local recruiter.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Contact the Judge Advocate General of the US Army and request that they investigate these peoples backgrounds and also contact the US Army Surgeon General and again ask that they investigate those in question! If you know where they are currently stationed contact the Provost Marshall and request that they be taken into custody awaiting action from the JAG! Also contact the Department of Defense and request that the recruiters involved with their enlistment be reviewed for possible violations and that they be ordered to supply all records involving this matter to the JAG immediately! Your House and Senate people should also be informed about these proceedings and request that they be actively involved with this review and send copies to all parties connected!

  • 1 decade ago

    Completely unrelated but it offers a view into what gets tolerated in this world:

    "Equal justice under the law?" Not in (surprise surprise) m Assachusetts:

    63 year old Lawrence, MA school committee member James Stokes-- who claimed a 20 year career in the United States Marine Corps, during which he asserted he had won (and wore) a Purple Heart--

    has today with much mutual self-congratulation all around plea bargained down to two MISDEMEANORS (!!!!) for "falsifying a government document" (his forged USMC honorable discharge) and... just sort of mutual hand flapping at that whole Purple Heart "thing."

    Hardly surprising treatment for a liberal politician in the Commonwealth of m Assachusetts with a far bigger fish swimming free as a birdie to mix animal metaphors.

    So much for the Great & Glorious FEDERAL Law and its mandated FELONY penalties. shame.gif

    Of course, m Assachusetts is Cloud Cuckoo-land in prestidigitating "implied" statutes out of thin air--and the Nacht-und-Nebel gavelled opposite--so the rule of law there is much as it was ... circa 1773.

    Some animals are and apparently always will be more equal than others.

  • Ray H
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    This is a case of don't ask, don't tell. It doesn't just apply to homosexuals. If these men do their jobs competently, and well, let it go. If you feel they are a danger to yourself, themselves, or others, then consider taking it to their NCOIC. By the way, many soldiers, especially the young ones, tend to embellish their stories.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    If they are doing quite well serving our country, then so be it. You have to go through a quite extensive medical/pcycho thing before you enlist. If they didn't catch it, and they are doing well, then what's the problem? We can sit here and bag on Military, but them, and them alone are the only reason why we are allowed to. Thanks for giving me Freedom Aspergus guy!

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.