Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Social SciencePsychology · 1 decade ago

can you explain what Pavlov's drooling dogs experiment meant?

the experiment goes something like this:

bring dogs food, they drool

do it enough times, they drool even as they hear footsteps of you coming, whether or not you actually have food.

so if the possibility of food was out there, they'd drool.

what was he trying to say about people from this experiment?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Ivan Pavlov's experiment consisted of feeding dogs and ringing a bell at the same time. The dog would naturally salivate when they saw the food--after a while the dogs would drool upon hearing the sound of the bell--the dogs had associated the sound of the bell with feeding time. this speaks to the association of an unexpected response (the drool) to an unlikely stimulus--the bell. In people it can be related to PTSD--Post traumatic stress disorder--war vets may break into a sweat upon hearing a book fall to the floor. The sound of food wrappings being torn--candy paper, snack bags, or that sound that soda cans make when you open them--may trigger a person to seek out a snack. Also, it speaks to the associations that people make to a seemingly unrelated event--the sound that a computer makes when it powers up may cause an Internet voyeur to become sexually excited--a person addicted to drugs may get cravings when they pass by their dealers neighborhood--the blue lights of a police car may cause a person who frequently drives intoxicated to break into a cold sweat. This is refereed to as classical conditioning and relates to associative learning.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Basically Pavlov's dogs is this... He had a group of dogs, before he would feed them he would ring a bell or buzzer everytime before feeding them. After so many times of doing this he would ONLY ring the bell and the dogs would rush up waiting to be fed without Pavlov even showing them the food. I know you were looking for more info, but hanging at a coffee shop and I only have my phone. But as a source most introductory courses for psychology talk about this. Hope this helps a little bit. A good and funny similiarity to this would be by searching "Pavlov Dogs The Office" where Jim does this to Dwight in a form of Altoid mints from the show The Office.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    can you explain what Pavlov's drooling dogs experiment meant?

    the experiment goes something like this:

    bring dogs food, they drool

    do it enough times, they drool even as they hear footsteps of you coming, whether or not you actually have food.

    so if the possibility of food was out there, they'd drool.

    what was he trying to say about people from...

    Source(s): explain pavlov 39 drooling dogs experiment meant: https://tr.im/c2Lc5
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I'm very familiar with this experiment. Here's what it means:

    He demonstrated what he termed an anticipatory response.

    People (and animals) react to stimuli (i.e. in this case, getting food). Before the dogs were fed, a light was turned on. Eventually, the dogs learned that the light meant they were about to be fed. The sight of food would make them salivate. After being conditioned they would salivate when the light went on, without actually seeing the food.

    You do this kind of thing all the time. Examples would be, if you eat lunch at the same time everyday, your stomach may "growl" around that time.

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  • dorthy
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Dog Salivating Experiment

  • james
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    It was a conditioned response. Everytime he rang the bell he fed the dogs. After a while he could just ring the bell and they would drool without the food being present.

  • The experiment demonstrates a psychological principle of behaviorism called "classical conditioning." People as well as animals can become classically conditioned to all sorts of previously neutral stimuli. When a stimulus is paired with a neutral stimulus, the person can respond to the neutral stimulus (now no longer "neutral") the same way that they respond to the stimulus (when they are paired together)..thus producing the same response.

    For example, suppose you are startled to hear a clap of thunder every time someone opens a window. After repeated exposure to this scenario, a person would come to expect to hear a clap of thunder each time a window is opened, and would anticipate this and thus react with fear even as they see someone walking toward the window to open it. What is classically conditioned can be undone. Suppose the same person is then exposed to several episodes where the same window is opened and nothing happens (no clap of thunder.) Eventually, the person will cease to expect to hear the thunder, and will not be afraid when they see someone walking toward the window to open it. (This is called "extinction.") Psychologists use this extinction process to help people overcome phobias and it is also used to extinguish undesired behaviors such as fetishes.

    Edit: A big "WHATEVER" to the person who gave my answer a "thumbs down"! lol!

    Source(s): psych student
  • 4 years ago

    Salivating Dog Experiment

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