How much is too much?

I'm 13 and i normally do about 10 hours of karate a week. I go for about 3 hours on Tuesday and Thursday and 4 hours on Friday. I also help my boyfriend in his training outside of classes since he's preparing to test for his 1st. This weekend I attended a convention with a few of the masters and Grand Masters of multiple styles and learned a lot. We did multiple styles traditional Okinowan Karate, Tae Kwon Do, Kickboxing, Tai Chi, and Kenpo skills, we also did some basic chi training, and it took a lot out of me. I do Kenpo and XMA and last Friday I hyperextended my elbow and reinjured my ankles and knees this week during P.E. and my regular classes so it was very difficult for me to keep doing the techniques and conditioning this week. My dad said I'm stacking up injuries and I know he's right, but it's hard for me to take it easy because of my schedule with karate and I'm getting ready for track. I'm aware that if I don't stop and take it easy for a little while I may have some...

Update:

permanent injuries but I don't know how to slow down. I need some advice from anyone who has over trained or understands what I'm talking about. I just need to learn how much or how long I should stay off the mats. I'm talking to my Sensei when i go in on Tuesday about teaching more and doing less, so i figure that will get a couple hours off of my training and hopefully then I'll be down to only about 6-8 hours.

Update 2:

like i mentioned I'm going to talk to them and see if i can do more teaching so I'm probably going to be cutting out the XMA and just go to helping run the class or doing desk work. Normally an injury doesn't bother me but I sprained my ankle, messed up my knee working on Judo with my dad, and my elbow is still very sore from last week so I can't do weapons or straighten it out all the way with out it hurting.

Update 3:

Um it's December so i dont think I'll try swimming for a month but I'll remember that for the summer. But thanks for the advice on the massages and strength training.

Update 4:

Do you think trying a lower impact style like Tai Chi would help, or any other low impact styles?

Update 5:

I've already got a 4.0 GPA so school is not an issue for me. But should I maybe stay off the mats more. Cause after I got my 1st dan my parents said i could take another style and I want to do old-style shotokan like my dad did but he said i have to heal up first so I really need to learn like what to do so I can still take classes.

Update 6:

so basically skipping class and icing my elbow/knees/ankles/other injuries is the best thing to do? I skipped doing my XMA class and since or regular instructor wasnt there we basically had free mat and i just ran class with having people work on there forms and taught the new kids how to do the basics and kicks instead of doing my routines.

13 Answers

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I have been guilty of "Limping into class" and also over training.

    I will give you the advise I was given by an expert.

    *Now is the time to put as much energy and passion into healing,as you have your training*

    Remember....You must be "Reasonable and Practical"

    "The candle that burns twice as bright,burns half as long."

    Source(s): Been There
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  • 1 decade ago

    You need to learn to listen to your body and pace yourself and your commitments. Any good athlete will usually encounter some injury in their training at some point but as you already said they are stacking up. What good is it to train and work out if you can not perform at optimum or near optimum levels in these things. I sometimes have students that stop training in martial arts because of other commitments and this may be what you have to consider doing. Track is a good example and your high school years are only here once. I never tell a student to quit something like that and sometimes recommend that they temporarily suspend their martial arts training if they are getting over extended. Martial arts will be there for them afterwords when track season is done and if you exercise some good judgment and restraint now it will pay off for you down the road. The alternative is to keep doing everything and your body will eventually break down in some way and you will be stuck not being able to do much of anything because of over-training and excess wear and tear and a lack of judgment.

    One of the ways you could do this is to cut your workouts back to one hour, three times a week. Also start doing some of your workouts in tennis shoes and don't throw more than at 3/4 speed and power in your techniques. This may give your body, joints, and muscles the rest it needs. Try to start looking at things more strategically or long range with respect to training and the demands you are going to put on your body and your training and some of this can all be avoided. Good luck!

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  • 1 decade ago

    Ok, So I currently tore a ligament in my left knee, and quite recently I just finished healing up my right thum from a tore ligament and wrist injury, so I know how you feel. I recomend taking it easy for a week and icing the areas that hurt. Have you been to a doctor? I went to mine for my knee, and she sayd that if it had torn more, then I would have needed knee surgery! and im 18! So right now, you only have a lot of little injuries, but if you keep pushing yourself too hard, you will have a very serious problem, and at your age, that would be really bad. I think that doing taichi is fine, but dont go low on the stances and for no reason do you try any of the chen forms! (theyr too explosive!). If you really cant take it easy, go to karate and teach, but dont do any demos that will be too hard for your body, as you could worsen your injuries. I do Taekwondo, Hapkido, Boxing, Taichi, Kendo, and Iaido so I know how you feel about having to stop doing the things you like because your hurt. But remeber that for you to be able to do all the things that you like, you have to be healthy and well, and if you hurt all the time you definetly wont be able to enjoy these things.

    But I am glad to see (read lol!) that a young lady such as yourself (im calling you young and im not that old! Jeeezz!!!) does all of these martial arts and enjoys them. So again, rest for a week, ice every couple hours, and dont do anything too straining on your body. If you really have all that energy, and you probably do, teach a class, do some taichi, or swim/ float in a pool. But remember, people also learn by watching, so dont rule that option out.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Hey my friend.....your dad is right. Take it from a guy who has been doing martial arts at a very high-level for the past 8 years. During competition time, I train around 15-20 hours per week. I train with a weight vest and all sorts of things. I have a bad back,my hip bothers me sometimes,and I recently dislocated my shoulder in a martial arts fight. I have all this and im only 20 years old!

    Take your time with your martial arts. You have the rest of your life to be good at it. Supplement your body with plenty of good foods and start taking some supplements for your joints as well like glucosamine and chondroiton. Also be sure to have a decent strength training program to keep your ligaments strong. Also, dont be afraid to take a break every now and again. Take a few weeks off and slowly rebuild yourself.........think about yourself as being a car. You need a tune-up!

    Source(s): too many injuries to count!
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Havent you ever pushed yourself to do something before only to have it blow up in your face before you rushed it? Some things take consistancy and patience to make it work, you can't push through everything

    You don't want to end up in a vicious cycle of training extremely hard, getting injured and taking time off, then geting depressed that you had to take time off so when you come back to train you train even harder, get injured AGAIN and so on and so forth

    Life is short but it's not that short, how about you write down your ideal, IDEAL week of training, what and how much training you will do each day, then start to slowly work on it, do as much as you can but if your body says no then relax a bit

    Next week improve on your goal, as long as you give yourself the rest when you need to eventually you will be doing your Ideal workout every week and then you can start to improve on that

    Doing Tai Chi and things like this are great ways to keep active and also improve your health and prepare your body when you get back into it, definately think about taking some time off, good luck

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  • 1 decade ago

    Its okay to take a break every now and again. Too many injuries can hinder you to compete or live your life to the fullest later. You are only 13, save some for when you turn 21. Stress is not healthy either. Your childhood lasts but only so long, enjoy being a kid. It would be really crappy to see or hear about someone so dedicated broken. In the long run a break from training for a lil while wouldn't hurt.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Cross train with a sport like swimming that's much lower impact than martial arts. You might consider strength training, to help injury-proof your body. Also, start getting full-body massages twice a month. I think you should keep up your training. It will do far more good than harm in the long run.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I used to suffer from over training also. Ive come to realise through the years that when I start having trouble waking in the mornings, i am grumpy and my thinking is slower than usual then I know I'm over training. If I'm training a lot but feel on top of the world and am happy and full of strength then I'm OK. That's how i judge if I'm over training.

    http://markschat.blogspot.com Fighting and Training Methods for Unarmed Martial Artists.

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  • Reaper
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Too much in martial arts is when you go past your limit and try to still go on. That's considered as not being smart. Don't do anything beyond your limit. As you practice each day, your limit would start to decrease and you would able to do more. Patience and rest is also part of the training. Never go lazy on your training though. Do it as much as you can without hurting yourself.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    maybe you can replace training (on a couple days) with something else like maybe drawing or researching history on different arts or if you want to cross train later on in life research some arts and see what they emphasize and do not do

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