US RATED LAST IN HEALTH CARE. Is America the worst of industrialized countries?

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080108/lf_afp/ushealthfrancemortality_080108191353
Update: I'd like to know what the average American thinks. Is health care in your country really that bad?
Update 2: SEMPER_P: Good idea! I should do some fact checking.... and I did. Heres what I found: " In Measuring the Health of Nations: Updating an Earlier Analysis" (Health Affairs, Jan./Feb. 2008), Ellen Nolte, Ph.D., and C. Martin McKee, M.D., D.Sc., both of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine,... show more SEMPER_P: Good idea! I should do some fact checking.... and I did. Heres what I found:

" In Measuring the Health of Nations: Updating an Earlier Analysis" (Health Affairs, Jan./Feb. 2008), Ellen Nolte, Ph.D., and C. Martin McKee, M.D., D.Sc., both of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, compared international rates of "amenable mortality"—that is, deaths from certain causes before age 75 that are potentially preventable with timely and effective health care. In addition to the U.S., the study included 14 Western European countries, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan. According to the authors, if the U.S. had been able reduce amenable mortality to the average rate achieved by the three top-performing countries, there would have been 101,000 fewer deaths annually by the end of the study period. What is "right care?" if people are dying needlessly?

Maybe the reason this organization wants governmental control of the HC sys. is because they know it's not working?
Update 3: I read the article on townhall.com. The author doesnt substantiate any of his claims. The whole article is based on his opinion. And it's also clearly a conservative website. William Bennett?
Update 4: sayteach: WOW. Thanx for the response! It seems as though the disabled in the states includes someone that is sick to the point of not being able to work or being close to death? I'm in Canada and the term takes on a narrower meaning. Such as "Physically not being able to move". Or at least in my... show more sayteach: WOW. Thanx for the response! It seems as though the disabled in the states includes someone that is sick to the point of not being able to work or being close to death? I'm in Canada and the term takes on a narrower meaning. Such as "Physically not being able to move". Or at least in my head it does ;>. For instance having a leg cut below the knee means youre disabled; you can't move around freely. If youre sick though we just say youre "sick". Even though by definition being too sick to move or work and not being able to move freely would should both equal disabled it just doesn't in my mind. That simple difference is an important distinction between our country's view on health care. Interesting!

But your first couple of paragraphs seem to be backed up by the study. Preventable deaths not being prevented. The disabled die waiting for insurance co's to hold their end of the bargan. I wonder if unitedHealth was hoping the person died before they could solve the case of
Update 5: messed up communications problem?
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