Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Computers & InternetHardwareAdd-ons · 1 decade ago

good Gaming PC?

ok i know the processor isnt the best but i am trying to save $$$ cos im only a kid and saved up to 1,080$. So leave me suggestions. when the 9800 comes out i may get an 8800.

I mainly play bf2(NEED IN HI RES) a few steam games,small games like runescape, mods for games, and ill probably add more but not much more games

2.33Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo E6550 4MB Cache FSB 1333

Masscool Quiet W553B1M3 26.2dBA

ASUS P5K (Intel P35, 2xPCIEx, 8-Channel Audio, LAN, 4xSATA2, 1394, 1333FSB)

2GB (1GBx2) PC6400 DDR2 800Mhz Memory Lifetime Warranty

320GB 7200RPM 16MB Cache Serial ATA300

18X Samsung SH-S182D Dual Layer DVD+/-RW/CDRW w/Nero

512MB nVidia GeForce 8800GT GDDR3 PCI Express DVI/Tvout

Microsoft Windows XP Home SP2

Apevia Black X-Plorer (4 5.25, 5 3.5 bays) 2 Fans, Window, Front Audio/USB/1394/Temp

550watt Cooler Master eXtreme Power RS-550-PCAR

Onboard LAN included

Onboard Sound included

Stereo Speakers (black)

Blue Neon Light for Case

Standard 1 year parts and labor(THIS WAS 0$)

$1,097.00

2 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    If you were to build this system and order all the parts from a newegg.com or a Tigerdirect.com, this would be a great deal. However, I know that this setup is from a company online that pre-build computers or custom build computers. Frankly, you will not receive the highest quality products choosing this route, however you being offered two things of value here. The graphics card being that it is an 8800GT which cost around 300 dollars and the CPU which costs around 180 dollars. There is nothing wrong with anything you will be given with your purchase. 320 GB hard drive is nothing to snuff at, however you can buy this for 80 dollars. The memory you can buy for 50. The cabling is not going to add much to your cost, especially if you buy XFX Motherboard.

    If you have a little computer know how, I would configure a system yourself for almost the same cost. First, for 10 dollars more you can get the e6750 which has significantly higher clock speed, 2.66 GHz instead of 2.3 GHz. You really need a better CPU cooler something decently silent as well. Go with the Tuniq Tower 120, I know that it is 50 dollars but there are many features and performance advantages that make it worth it. Instead of the Samsung drive, go with an HP light scribe, they invented the light scribe technology after all. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LightScribe I have burnt many DVD’s on the HP without any coasters. The light scribe is pretty cool as well.

    If you buy an Intel motherboard that will be able to run 65nm chips and 45 nm chips you will be set for the next few years. Having SATA support and the fastest FSB possible will enable you not to upgrade for a while. If you can get 1333MHz FSB you are set. The only thing is SLI is not on the board you recommended unless you pay much more. I honestly don’t think you need it. However if you think you do you better make sure that the P5K version you purchase has it. For SLI and everything else you would ever need, the P5K version will cost you 200 dollars. For 150 dollars you can buy the XFX nForce 680i LT SLI that does everything and comes with cables. Here is a Tigerdirect link:

    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtool...

    The 550 watt power supply will work effectively to power everything now or at least that is the hope. Currently the PSU you stated cost about 92 dollars. However, here is the deal; you will someday want to expand your computer. Someday you will want to add an extra graphics card into an SLI configuration (if you have the right motherboard) , add two extra hard drives, add a TV tuner card, or add a soundcard. In the event that you don’t have enough power being supplied to your components after your upgrade, you have to buy another PSU at that point. NO FUN! The best way to look at this issue to is, buy something NOW that will be able to run with upgrades and overclocking for the future. Basically, a power supply with three rails, modular connections, and enough power for future upgrades is what you need to consider. In this case I would go with something like the Antec NeoHE 650 or a Cooler Master with 650 watts and Mod Connections. That should be enough power for your game usage and power hungry applications with consideration to future upgrades.

    Here is a guide of how power supplies work and what is important when considering your future needs: http://www.bleedinedge.com/guides/psu_select/psu_s...

    The 8800GT is defiantly worth spending money on now. I know that if you wait someday it will go down in price, but by the time it may be difficult to find it on store shelves. Then you will want to wait for something better then the 9800GT. The 8800GT for the value is a steal, especially if you can find it under 300 dollars. Direct X 10, have you seen coverage for it? It is simply astonishing. With this graphics card in your system you can throw anything at it and it won’t choke. Playing games in High Resolution Settings is such a benefit. Here is a link that has a video about the card:

    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTool...

    I would invest in a better case personally. Good heat flow with easy access and upgrade functionality is a major bonus. It costs more now but in the long run, saves you a lot of heartache. I bought a cheap case from a pc show and ever since I know I should have invested more in it. The sound insulation is terrible and the look of the case is not brilliant! You can buy a great case for 100-150 dollars.

    When it comes to dollars and cents, the custom build by online company seems like the best deal especially since it is guaranteed for one year. However that means if you computer breaks down you’re stuck without a computer for a few weeks (because you have to send it in). The best way to go about it is to be your own technician. Customizing your own computer and following it up with High Quality components, is the best way to go. You will end up spending the same or a little more then the prebuild but the experience will be far greater value than the difference. Really the difference is only going to be about $150 dollars but you bought much higher quality parts than what was offered with the prebuild. So you are maxing out the value of your purchases and at the same time sticking close to your budget.

    If you have any more concerns,

    Just let me know.

    Good Luck!

    Best Wishs!

    Source(s): Sources are listed in the Answer. I have four years of Computer Building Experience.
  • 1 decade ago

    its a good pc only you try to increase the power supply to around 750w to be safe cause your com is pretty power consuming with all the fan and stuff running. samsung drives arent the best so keep in mind. for harddrive better to go for seagate. for a more reliable and not to be overclock computer go for intel motherboards they are the best. this comes from experience.

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