Are soft coated wheaten terrier's easy to train because I have a male and a female?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Hope this helps!

    The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is an alert and happy animal - graceful, strong and well-coordinated. A playful and friendly terrier. They make great watch dogs and bark at the arrival of guests. They are usually very loving with children and get along reasonably well with other dogs (provided they are socialized when they are young). They do not get along well with cats. All it takes is some fast movement on the part of the cat, and the dog's instincts will take over and he will attack. They have a puppy attitude that remains with it throughout its life. Sweet-tempered, easy-going and self-confident. This breed needs to be taught when it's young what is and is not acceptable behavior. It is very intelligent, so it will generally grasp quickly what is required of them. They have a straightforward nature and need to be handled in a straightforward manner. Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers bond extremely closely with their family. They seldom bark unnecessarily. Though not as aggressive as many other terriers, males may be combative with other male dogs if challenged. The Soft Coated Wheaten should be well socialized with other dogs while they are young puppies.

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  • 4 years ago

    The issue is that dogs are poor generalizers - it's not that the dog is "sneaky, greedy" etc, but that they have no intrinsic sense of morality or "rightness" and so only think something is "bad" if it has bad consequences. If it has never had bad consequences except with a human in the room, then how on earth are they to know that the rules still apply with the human out of the room? You need to train in such a way that corrections and rewards occur when the dog does not think you are present - i.e. hiding around the corner. Read here https://tr.im/OlhCJ

    I personally owned a Labrador Retriever (read: chow hound) that could be left 6" from a hot dog in a sit-stay for half an hour and not touch it - the word was "mine" and it meant that you don't touch that, even if I am not in the room, even if whatever, you DO NOT touch that. You could leave a plate of food on the floor for hours and not only would she not touch it, she would also keep the other animals (dogs and cats) from touching it.

    In all probability, these dogs studied were just not properly trained/proofed before the experiment. With "proofing" to set them up and catch them in the act to give

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  • 1 decade ago

    No, they are not. Most terriers are a handful, and SCWTs are no exception.

    Did you get two pups that are littermates? This is a disastrous idea for a beginner. Honestly, I'd see if the breeder will take one back. It's not good for the dogs or for you.

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  • 1 decade ago

    By the time they would come into obedience classes, they were out of control, so I would suggest finding training classes in your area and start early. You will see a big difference in behavior as long as you put in the time with them. They are sweet dogs. The children in class with them, love doing the tricks with a clicker.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    With the proper instruction, discipline and rewards all dogs are easy to train. Remember that if you are stressed then they are stressed. Try and find the least stressful way to train. Try to remember that they are puppies and puppies make mistakes.

    Source(s): Dog walker, Breeder, and Groomer
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Wow, maybe you should have done some research BEFORE you got the dogs.

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