Is the Chickepox virus deadly to a 8month old little boy?

MY SON IS 8 MONTHS OLD AND WE WERE RECENTLY AROUND MY 4 MONTH NEICE WHO HAS CHICKENPOX (WE DID NOT KNOW SHE HAD THEM WHEN WE WERE AROUND HER). AND NOW I AM WORRIED ABOUT HIM GETTING INFECTED!! HE IS UP TO DATE WITH ALL SHOTS!!! BUT I READ A LONG TIME AGO IN SOME ARTICLE THAT CHICKENPOX IS MORE DANGEROUS IN A LITTLE BOY THEN LITTLE GIRL!!! HELP PLEASE!!!

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  • 1 decade ago
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    No chickenpox is not deadly. Most of us had it growing up and came out ok. Actually, if he gets it, since he is young, the infection will probably be mild. Also getting it is better immunity than the vaccine. The vaccine is not given until after 1 year of age. Measles is has greater risks of complications. Also, contact your pediatrician. They can give you some advice on what to do to make it easier on him if he gets it.

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  • 1 decade ago

    FYI

    Symptoms and Complications of Chickenpox

    Flu-like symptoms start to develop a day or two before an itchy red rash appears. Fatigue, mild headache, fever, chills, and muscle or joint aches are typical. The rash emerges as raised red bumps that turn to teardrop-shaped blisters that are extremely itchy. These blisters may appear anywhere on the body, usually starting on the scalp, spreading to the trunk or torso, and then to the arms and legs. The face and hands are rarely affected heavily, though some people get rashes all over their body.

    The blisters come in waves, with new crops developing as old ones burst. New blisters stop forming within about five days. By the sixth day, most blisters will have burst, dried, and crusted over. Two weeks after that, most of the scabs will have disappeared. Children usually have a much milder infection and recover faster than adults. Babies, adults, and those with weakened immune systems tend to have more severe and longer-lasting symptoms. They are at higher risk of developing complications, including inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) and pneumonia. There is a 30% death rate in newborns whose mothers develop chickenpox a few days before or after birth.

    Children who have had the chickenpox vaccine can still get chickenpox. However, they usually have a much milder case with a smaller number of blisters.

    Cellulitis (a skin infection from bacteria) is by far the most common complication in children. It may leave scarring, especially if the child scratches the lesions. Necrotizing fasciitis ("flesh-eating disease") in children, though extremely rare, can occur as a complication of infection entering through the chickenpox lesions. An awkward problem occurs when chickenpox blisters appear in the mouth, throat, or anus. Lesions in these places are very uncomfortable. If the rash gets near the eyes, consult your doctor.

    Like many viruses, the varicella-zoster virus is never completely gone once it has entered your body. Anyone who's had chickenpox carries dormant viruses in the roots of their nerve cells. These can sometimes reappear years later as shingles, a painful skin rash which affects a particular area of skin.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Chickenpox is generally not deadly to a child under the age of 9. It can cause scarring, however because it's hard to get such a tiny tot not to scratch.

    Even before the chicken pox vaccine, the majority of child deaths from chicken pox were kids over the age of 9, and yes, boys will more commonly become more severely ill. The little girl who played Carol Ann in the movie "Poltergeist" was perhaps the most famous death - she died at 10 from chicken pox.

    Healthy children normally don't have any problems with chickenpox, but children who are ill can have significant injury (and folks, that counts as much as death, don't you think?).

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  • 1 decade ago

    No, it is actually best to get chickenpox during childhood. Should you see any signs of chickenpox, call your pediatrician to let her/him know.

    Usually, the children who get really sick from chickenpox are those who already have health issues.

    It is actually best to get chickenpox when young. Having the disease offers much better immunity protection than the vaccine does.

    Varicella does become a problem for teenagers and adults. So keep baby away from adults/teens who have not had chickenpox before.

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  • 1 decade ago

    He'll be uncomfortable if he gets them, but its not deadly in any way, shape or form. Chicken pox is a normal virus for most people. In children, its almost never serious enough to require intervention, and is actually MUCH more dangerous in adults.

    If he is an otherwise healthy child, I'd just keep an eye out for normal signs of complications : dehydration, high fever, incessant crying, acting lethargic, refusing to eat.

    Good luck and be aware that he'll be contagious for almost two weeks before he acutally gets spots. It'd be wise to keep him home for a bit even before he's " sick " with them.

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  • 1 decade ago

    No. You should take him to the doctor if you see signs of chickenpox anyway.. but at 8 months, it's unlikely to do him any damage. Chickenpox gets serious in adults.. kids are usually fine.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Just a rash and discomfort. he will be fine!!!

    **it is the media and money-hungry doctors that has lead us to believe that chicken pox are such a horrible, deadly thing .... and that "omg, everyone must get a shot so you don't get them!!".

    Chicken pox are NOT that big of a deal. They are no more harmful than a common cold.

    and p.s. to a poster below, Carol Ann from Poltergeist died from Crohn's Disease at the age of 12.

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  • 1 decade ago

    In old people and young babies with weak immune systems yes it can be dangerous. Don't ask me why, but the males that I know who have had chicken pox do seem to get sicker than the females. If he does get chicken pox just make sure that you take him to the doctor. He should be okay.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No. Chicken Pox is usually a very mild disease. The only risk with getting it young is that they may get it again. It's also very difficult to stop a baby from scratching, so you may get more scars. But it's rarely life-threatening.

    Mumps is the disease that's more dangerous for boys than girls.

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  • Natz
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    its actually better if they get chicken pox while they are young. i was deliberately going round people who had chicken pox with my daughter so she could get them out the way with but no such luck! its uncomfortable for them to have but it really is better while theyre young. the older they get the more dangerous it becomes. and, incase you were wondering, chicken pox isnt spread by skin contact - its spread by the infected person coughing or sneezing (sort of like a cold). Hope that helps.

    Source(s): Mum of 2
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