Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsBiology · 1 decade ago

Immunity question?

After Frank takes the cold pill, what kind of immunity was protecting himself? Explain.

Passive or active? I'm not sure...

For the questions I've asked, they gave me this long complex active immunity xD I didn't learn that yet, so I'm wondering if it's active or passive in general - please explain. Ty.

4 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    OK. The other people have explained what active and passive immunities are. The problem with your question is that medications for cold do not provide any immunity. They don't actually work against the cause of the cold (virus); what they do is to treat the symptoms (headaches, runny nose,...). Because they are not working against the cause of the symptoms, they are not considered to be antibodies and therefore they are not providing any immunity (which means that you can get a new infection while still fighting the first one or right after you have recovered from it).

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Active means that the body is doing a work.

    Passive means that the body does not do work.

    So, frank took an antibiotic and his body done no work. The antibodies inside the pills that do the job. It is a passive immunity. Ex: when a baby having colostrum(mothers' milk), the baby got passive immunity because the babys' body do not do a work.

    It's that simple!

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    This is Passive immunity.

    In the active immunity the body produces its own antibodies to defend against certain antigen. In the passive immunity the person is given the antibodies required to defend against the antigen.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Smarties is right. Taking cold medication doesn't provide immunity but only treatment of symptoms.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.