ROMNEY: "Freedom requires religion (& vice versa) ." Is this true, or does Religion obstruct Freedom?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    the words or concept of Freedom is diametrically opposed to the word / concept of Religion

    one is not free in a religion to be themselves or choose as they wish...they are BUT if they choose outside approved parameters they are sharply corrected / condemned and ostracized

    true freedom is being free to live irregardless of what a holy man or book says you should do, but a wise person will not avoid wise books and read more than one to get a balance

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  • 1 decade ago

    someone once said that religion prevents the poor from murdering the rich.

    In the case of the quote you have - we'd have to understand what Romney meant by Freedom - are we talking a political freedom or personal freedom? Religion is engrained in the human experience - to divorce it from humanity is to deny a basic tendency - hence a basic freedom. In cases where religion has been purged, you find by that very definition a lacking of freedom. Simply because a small minority choose to not follow religion does not negate the natural tendency for most to lean towards religion. This is something that will not ever be purged from humanity, despite the best intentions of the noisy athiest minority.

    I think sailcat probably has the best answer.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I think this depends on your definitions of both "freedom", as well as "religion".

    I heard a cool definition for freedom once, "Freedom is not the right to do what you want, but the power to do what is right." (I kinda like it, myself).

    Again, your definition of "religion" makes a difference also. For instance, what I gather from the Bible is that religion is to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, house the homeless, visit people in hospitals and in prison, et cetera.

    So, in context with the definitions I provided, religion promotes freedom. Your definitions might result in a different answer.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Disagree.

    Freedom doesn't requires Religion but Religion requires Freedom.

    Not vice versa.

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  • Kerry
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    I agree. Religion teaches us accountability and responsibility, which freedom requires. Freedom teaches us the same thing in order to function with civil order, the rule of law and not chaos.

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  • SuperN
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Depends on your definition of freedom I suppose. Religion restricts what you can do, but out of a desire to remain morally sound. Laws do the same thing, really. I mean, we're not living in total anarchy here. Wherever someone's freedom overlaps my rights, there are laws to protect me - and vise versa.

    However, when religion starts becoming law, and law starts restricting not only how my actions effect others, but how they effect ME (and my immortal soul even, wow), I think that's a case of religion obstructing my freedom.

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  • 1 decade ago

    "It is God who gave us life and liberty. Can the liberties of a nation be secure when we have removed the conviction that these liberties are a gift from God?" - Thomas Jefferson

    I thought about it, but decided that it was a quote from a man who worked so hard to keep freedom away from so very many.

    Like so many other things, religion helps promote freedom for some, hinders for others. There is no black or white.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You asked this 7 hours ago...did yout not get good answers?

    Yes, you need both because without both you're refusing a civil right. If you outlaw religion then you're not free because it's saying "you have to be *insert religion*(or atheist) whether you believe it or not" and in order to practice religion you must have freedom to do so.

    Stop trying to make a big deal about it when it's not.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I don't think freedom *requires* religion. But I do think religion requires freedom -- freedom to believe as you wish, or not at all.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Freedom in the United States is something given to all its citizens and can not be compromised for the sake to one groups particular ideology. Oppressing others by forcibly interjecting religion on them is neither moral or ethical.

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