Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsChemistry · 1 decade ago

Chemistry - Covalent and polar-covalent bonding?

I'm struggling a bit at the moment in chemistry class understanding bonding. Would someone mind explaining the differences to me between covalent and polar-covalent bonding?

Thanks!

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  • 1 decade ago
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    In a covalent bond, valence electrons are equally shared among atoms. Carbon is known to make very strong covalent bonds with itself and many other atoms such as S, H, O, and N. For instance, methane looks like this.

    __H

    H-C-H (ignore the _)

    __H

    There is no polarity (charges are equally distributed). The C-H bonds are very strong.

    In a polar covalent bond, electrons are still shared, but there exists a dipole moment (partial charges exist among atoms in the molecule). An obvious example is water.

    H-O-H

    Oxygen is very electronegative. In simple terms, oxygen is greedy and wants all the electrons it can get. Oxygen is partially negative in this case and the hydrogens are partially positive. That is a polar covalent bond.

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  • 1 decade ago

    ok i'll try. Covalent bonding is basically the sharing of electrons. So that both atoms become noble gases. For example: HCl. Hydrogen originally has one electron, but it needs one more to be stable right? And Chlorine has 7 valence electrons, but again it needs one electron to be stable. So the two atoms share their electrons with one another, making each of them "happy" Because now Hydrogen has 2 electrons and chlorine has 8.

    Polar covalent bonding is simply taking this process a step further. First find out if the molecule is covalent...after that draw a Lewis structure of that molecule. If its symmetrical then the molecule is non-polar. If its not symmetrical then its polar covalent bonding. Another way of determining this, is if the molecule is able to dissolve in water it is polar covalent. if it cant then its non-polar.

    I hope this helped.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Covalent bonding is when atoms share electrons with each other (notice the word valence is in Covalent). Usually when this happens, one atom will get the electrons more than the other atom and so one atom will be positively charged for the most part and the other will be negatively charged for the most part. This is what is known as a polar covalent bond (because one side is positive and the other is negative).

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  • 4 years ago

    Flouride is more electronegative than hydrogen therefore the HF bond is polar with dipole moment that goes in the direction of Flourine, the more electronegative atom. The Answer is D A, B, and C are wrong because they are bonded to the themselves therefore their bonds cannot be polar. One atom in the bond has to be more electronegative than the other for there to be polarity or one molecule has to be hogging all the electrons.

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  • 1 decade ago

    i will. i will send you a message. chemistry is my thing!!

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