promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted
Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

What if you wrote a Sci-Fi novel and a movie producer advises you...?

Scifi novel-to-movie usually don't do to well because it's difficult to capture all of the imagery and intensity. If the producer then says he would produce the movie but it will probably just make enough money to make you comfortable but it will be at the sacrifice of your reputation, would you do it anyway or not? I asked this question in the movie section but they're asleep over there.

12 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Miles I think that you are being played. I think you suspect it yourself since you are asking this question and you should trust your intuition. Movies make millions of dollars but it's the movie production houses that make it not the writers so that much is basically true - that said look at what happened to JK Rowling. She was a single mom on social assistance when she started writing the potter series of books and the reason she has become a billion dollar business was because the timing was perfect. The first couple of books went bestseller before the movie deal - couple that with the fact that the book publishing industry had not had a super-star in the children's story genre for decades so there was what is called a vertical niche to fill. Ultimately what makes the difference between a marginally successful movie and a block-buster is that it has the necessary ingredients that make it appeal to a large group of people - "I am legend" with Will Smith is a good example of traditional Sci-Fi that has made the transition to the big screen because it has certain elements that are a known formula for success. The same story has been made into a movie twice before, once in the early 60's and again in the 70's, each time it has refined the formula - but it has trended away from the original story somewhat. Stories about dystopic futures have always appealed to people most at times when they are angry with the government. War themes sell when there is a war on, and when the government wants to grease the wheels of patriotism and propaganda films get a production house a few kickbacks. When you want to make a movie about something with fairy-tale, magical or religious themes you should aim for a release at the holidays and so on -- It does surprise me that you write Sci-Fi and haven't considered writing for television rather than Movies - since they tend to be more interested in trying new things. Alternatively go to the Canadian, British, Japanese or Chinese producers rather than Hollywood - they tend to be more welcoming to ideas that are not just a remake of something they made 3 times before.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Well, I WAS going to make a joke about the sci fi flick John Travolta made concerning one of Ron Hubbard's sci fi books, (until he turned them into a religion, Scientology) but I will answer your question honestly. True, sci fi novels to movies are very difficult. Look at the movie, "Dune"- I thought it was awful, compared to the book. If this script that you wrote was completely important to you and you wouldn't compromise your reputation for money, I'd never agree to the producer. Look at the actor, Christian Bale. He was famous for doing, "Empire Of The Sun" when he was a kid, but NOW, HE chooses his roles. I respect him a lot for that. Throw some popcorn at those movie people! :o)

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Steph
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Orson Scott Card has been trying to get his Ender's Game into a movie for like 20 years now, and every time he moves one step forward, he gets moved forcibly two steps back. Stay away from film until you've totally established yourself as an author, then if that book really was good enough for film, you'll still have the offer on the table 20 years from now (and maybe a promise of more money!)

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    If you have to have a limited budget production, you can't have much of a reputation to worry about, not yet anyway. Production deals don't come along every day, I'd grab it. Any production is better than nothing, and most film-makers make a few stinkers before the money starts to get better. I say when opportunity knocks, grab it.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    Seems you hit another wrong subject title . But why else do they make so many movies with the hope of at least break even - A profit in this game is a BIG bonus . 1 in 10 fail totally

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Say yes on the condition that you retain full copyright, (which prohibits them from changing the story without your permission) you be retained as Creative Consultant to keep the movie true to the story, and ask for 5% of the profits from cinema revenues and DVD sales. That way, whether it's a box-office smash or bust, you still get royalties for the rest of your life.

    Good luck.

    .

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Dude really thats a personal question. I'm a chef and if I planned a menu and the General manager said we will make some changes and we will put your name on the dishes. If I did not approve I would have to work with them until I did, or I would have to not allow the changes to the menu, I hope that helps.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Scifi novel-to-movie usually don't do too well because they completely butcher the story to make it understandable for the lowest common denominator (that is, the great American Idiot) IMHO. I would refuse.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • tuinui
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    The last time you asked this question the words were all messed up somehow.

    Any way, once again, yes, if I can be sure the movie studio will make a good job of it.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The money they pay you upfront is all you can expect. No movie actually 'makes money' once the creative accountants get done with it.

    Source(s): Wrote an episode of 'Marblehead Manor'
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.