is fatty liver a serious problem from drinking?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Description

    Also called steatosis, fatty liver can be a temporary or long-term condition, which is not harmful itself, but may indicate some other type of problem. Left untreated, it can contribute to other illnesses. It is usually reversible once the cause of the problem is diagnosed and corrected. The liver is the organ responsible for changing fats eaten in the diet to types of fat that can be stored and used by the body. Triglycerides are one of the forms of fat stored by the body and used for energy and new cell formation. The break down of fats in the liver can be disrupted by alcoholism, malnutrition, pregnancy, or poisoning. In fatty liver, large droplets of fat, containing mostly triglycerides, collect within cells of the liver. The condition is generally not painful and may go unnoticed for a long period of time. In severe cases, the liver can increase to over three times its normal size and may be painful and tender.

    Causes and symptoms

    The most common cause of fatty liver in the United States is alcoholism. In alcoholic fatty liver, over consumption of alcohol changes the way that the liver breaks down and stores fats. Often, people with chronic alcoholism also suffer from malnutrition by eating irregularly and not consuming a balanced diet. Conditions that can also cause fatty liver are other forms of malnutrition (especially when there is not enough protein in the diet), obesity, diabetes mellitus, and Reye's syndrome in children. Pregnancy can cause a rare, but serious form of fatty liver that starts late in pregnancy and may be associated with jaundice and liver failure. Some drug overdoses or toxic chemical poisonings, such as carbon tetrachloride, can also cause fatty liver.

    Often, there are no symptoms associated with fatty liver. If there are symptoms, they can include pain under the rib cage on the right side of the body, swelling of the abdomen, jaundice, and fever. Symptoms that occur less often in alcoholic fatty liver, but more often in pregnancy related fatty liver, are nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and abdominal pain.

    I learned something new today thanks to your question. On another site it said too many soft drinks can cause fatty liver too.

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  • 1 decade ago

    OK. Let's avoid cutting and pasting from medical websites. Fatty liver is the earliest stage of alcoholic liver disease. It's your livers reaction to too much booze. It is a reversible condition and your liver can go back to normal with reduced alcohol intake.If you continue to drink at the level that has caused the fatty change things may progress (via alcoholic hepatitis which may be silent) to cirrhosis. The time it takes for this is variable and indeed some people never do reach this stage. Never the less this is a warning and you should cut down ASAP.

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  • Andrea
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Fatty liver disease affects a whopping 30% of the population. That's 30 out of every 100 people! And some estimates have it at 33%.

    And if you're overweight, it's even worse overweight people are extremely more likely than healthy weight individuals to develop this condition.

    In other words, you're not alone. Not by a long shot.

    Other fatty liver sufferers have reversed their condition, lost weight, and rediscovered their energy, using completely natural remedies. And that means you can, too!

    Keep reading to discover more...

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    is fatty liver a serious problem from drinking?

    Source(s): fatty liver problem drinking: https://shortly.im/3VOyo
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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Yes because Fatty liver can occur after drinking moderate or large amounts of alcohol. It can even occur after a short period of heavy drinking (acute alcoholic liver disease).

    Genetics or heredity (what is passed down from parent to child) plays a role in alcoholic liver disease in two ways: It may influence how much alcohol you consume and your likelihood of developing alcoholism. And, it may also affect levels of liver enzymes involved in the breakdown (metabolism) of alcohol.

    To know more details how to treat fatty liver , you can refer to :http://adola.net/go/fattyliver-bible/

    Hope this useful!

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  • 1 decade ago

    Fatty liver is a misnomer. Liver disease is more exact and yes it is a serious problem. It is usually accompanied by pancreatic problems, vitamin B deficiency, malnutrition, easy bruising, personality disorder, and fatigue. And, those are only the stage one symptoms.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes. I was watching discovery Health last week ...It was an autopsy show..they were trying to determine the cause of death of this heavy woman who had gastric bypass surgery previously...and discovered that the cause of death had nothing to do with complications of that surgery. And when they began to remove, weigh, and examine the internal organs the liver had alot of large fat cells, and the color was abnormal due to this. and it was determined that she died from the effect of the fatty liver---caused by drinking heavily. Which they determined which was not something that was happening over time but in one sitting.

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  • 1 decade ago

    yes it is because the liver then goes on to develop cihrosis.

    The link below gives you the full run down on fatty liver alcohol driven or not

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Go for protein rather than sugar to keep energy levels going strong rather than crashing. Edamame in pods would be the perfect snack since it takes time to eat and a one-cup portion offers 12 grams of necessary protein.

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