Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 1 decade ago

Can the sentence "Their wrong" possibly be grammatically correct?

Someone is trying to convince me that it can, as it is the person's wrong. Personally, I think that's a load of bull. That's like saying people "own" hate, love, jealousy and other emotions. I mean, can I really go onto eBay and say "I'm selling confidence! Only £5!"? I think not.

Update:

Thanks for all the replys so far, but to the guy saying about excersising "Their right", which could also be used to say "their wrong", we are referring to another person. Like, "They're [government] wrong about demoting Cannabis to a Class C drug" or something like that. I'm pretty sure "Their wrong" can't be used in that way. Sorry for not including that vital detail =p

12 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    As a result of their wrong choice, one of them was hurt tonight.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes, it could theoretically be grammatically correct.

    People can exercise "their right" to do something. So, I imagine that "their wrong" is a combination of words that could possibly be as grammatically correct as "their right" although at the moment, I can't think of a specific example.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Sure. Wrong can be a noun, so someone can possess it.

    They committed a wrong that night, and now their wrong has come back to haunt them.

    Or something of that nature. Sure, it's a little awkward, but it can be considered grammatically correct.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Sorry, but your friend is right - the word "wrong" can be used as a noun. It is grammatically correct to say "their wrong".

    From dictionary.com:

    –noun

    8. that which is wrong, or not in accordance with morality, goodness, or truth; evil: I committed many wrongs.

    9. an injustice: The wrongs they suffered aged them.

    10. Law.

    a. an invasion of another's right, to his damage.

    b. a tort.

    Source(s): www.dictionary.com
    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Like one said, they can own a wrong. But "their wrong" is a fragment. What about their wrong? What caused their wrong? Do they know it was their wrong and not just his or her wrong? Did their wrong wake up one morning and have a banana? No, it would have to be "They're wrong" to be complete, grammatically correct sentence.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Their wrong is not a sentence. But if you said the outlaws came back to town to right their wrongs. You would be correct.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    "Their wrong" is not a complete sentence, but it is a grammatically correct phrase. Compare it to "my bad". It denotes a person's error, misdeed, sin, etc.

    Here are some examples :

    Who, thence resolving to confront the throng,

    Demanded dauntlessly to hear their wrong"

    (Richard II, by George Raymond)

    "Much as we feel our wrong, I fear that they feel their wrong more"

    (A letter from Charles Dickens to Charles Knight)

    "Tell the Senate to Right Their Wrong on Iran"

    (http://www.congress.org/peaceactionwest/issues/ale...

    "Why should you be surprised when they blameshift? when they ignore their wrong? when they make excuses?"

    (http://garlandsgrace.wordpress.com/2007/02/12/im-s...

    Some add "-doing" to the word to make it "wrong-doing", which sounds a little easier on some ears, but it's the same thing.

    And yes, we do "own" our emotions when it comes to grammar. After all, My love for my husband is infinite and my irritation toward him when he forgets our anniversary is fleeting. But I forgive his wrongs toward me, just as he forgives me of my wrongs toward him.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    But if they spelled it incorrectly, that would mean they are wrong. I think we have the makings of an infinite regress here.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    The phrase is "they're wrong", as in "they are wrong". They just spelled it wrong, changing the meaning.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Not the way YOU have it spelled.

    "They're wrong" is the correct way to spell it.

    There

    Their

    They're

    It's NOT ALL THE SAME THING.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.