Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 1 decade ago

u.s. torture?

what is the U.S policy on torture? Bush never gives a straight answer so can some one please explain it? thank you

Update:

so is it not allowed or it is?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    International and U.S. law prohibits torture and other ill-treatment of any person in custody in all circumstances. The prohibition applies to the United States during times of peace, armed conflict, or a state of emergency. Any person, whether a U.S. national or a non-citizen, is protected. It is irrelevant whether the detainee is determined to be a prisoner-of-war, a protected person, or a so-called “security detainee” or “unlawful combatant.” And the prohibition is in effect within the territory of the United States or any place anywhere U.S. authorities have control over a person. In short, the prohibition against torture and ill-treatment is absolute.

    The following summary sets out the major international legal obligations of the United States and various legal bases by which U.S. officials, military personnel and others could be prosecuted for torture or other mistreatment of persons held at U.S. military and intelligence detention facilities. Included are web links to the cited international conventions and federal statutes.

    Bush allowed torture though he later denied it. Torture violates US and Internatrional law. Article VI of the US Constitution states that:

    "This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land;"

    Torutre violates the US constitution as well. I's truly anti American and sends a very wrong message.

    Bush allowed torture, that makes him a criminal

    http://hrw.org/english/docs/2004/06/07/usdom8778.h...

    http://jimbovard.com/blog/2006/12/08/american-cons...

    http://www.president-bush.com/torturers.htm

    http://qwstnevrythg.blog-city.com/bush_is_right_to...

    http://www.capitolhillblue.com/cont/node/3498

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    We subscribe to international treaties that describe torture and other practices that are banned. We were the main drivers of these treaties, mostly after both world wars.

    President Bush doesn't believe that the US needs to be bound by treaties or international law. He doesn't even really feel bound by our own Constitution. To Bush, it's what he can get away with, which is a lot, especially when he had a Republican Congress. He has also imprisoned people without charges or due process, just on his own say-so, and has suspended habeas corpus, one of the most basic protections of the accused, going back to the Magna Carta.

    When he came into office, Bush put his faith in a group called the Project for a New American Century. Their premise was basically that as the last remaining superpower, we can do as we please in the world. Other countries can complain but they can't do much. But even we Americans ourselves are not safe from a president who doesn't respect the constitutional limits of his office.

    To Republicans, this is a matter of national pride, that we can do as we please, unhindered by other nations or previous agreements. The new motto of the Republican Party is: "Oh yeah? So who's gonna stop us?"

    One way Bush explains this is by having his attorney general 'redefine' such practices as waterboarding as not torture. When he explains this in a press conference, you'll always notice he sort of smirks and winks his eye. 8^)

    They held one of those unending series of 'debates' for the Republican candidates in South Carolina a few weeks. ago, and the subject of torture came up. This being South Carolina, the most 'conservative' state, the two front runners, Giuliani and Romney, tried to outdo each other in their support for torture. Both said they would imprison and torture -more-, not less. Then it was John McCain's turn to speak, a man who, as a prisoner of war, was tortured himself. McCain said "You know where the idea of 'waterboarding' comes from, don't you? It comes from the Spanish Inquistion. Surely we can do better than that."

    It just goes to show you how bad off we are that it takes a unique political courage to denounce the techniques of the Spanish Inquisition. 8^<

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  • 1 decade ago

    If you listen to the Candidates describe the answer to is torture allowed they to a person all say that we are openly against torture .

    Thats the same as standing in church and saying that you belief in God when you are an atheist .

    They all want torture as an option and thus we have a problem . The couple that are openly against it are not supported by the media .

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  • 1 decade ago

    Bush has stated publically that the US does not condone torture. This administration does not recognize certain techniques, long established as torture all over the world, as torture (like water boarding). Water boarding is even classified as torture within our own military field manual. Bush has ignored and violated the Geneva Convention and the US Constitution.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The U.S. is not supposed to torture, it goes against the Geneva Conventions. It is a criminal offense to to violate this law, so where are the charges for all those tortured Iraqi's?

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  • 1 decade ago

    In Marine Corps Boot Camp we were taught how to torture as a routine part of training.

    I find it odd that the Politicians deny something that is taught and practiced by the Armed Forces.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It is precisely defined under the U.S. Code and under the U.C.M.J. - the uniform code of military justice. And, despite former Attourney General Gonzales' lies, torture itself is precisely defined.

    Waterboarding is torture. Forcing someone into a severely cramped body posture and keeping them that way for hours and hours and forcing them to tolerate pissing and crapping on themselves is torture. Forcing them to remain in an icy cold environment for hours and hours is also torture. Headslaps are torture. Terrorizing a person with dogs is torture. Forcing them to stand around naked, lie down in a pile of other prisoners, all of whom are naked, is torture. Conducting mock executions is torture.

    Soldiers and civilians working for the United States have done and are still doing all these things to people. The United States is guilty of crimes against humanity, which torture constitutes. And George Bush should be tried for these crimes, because he was the one who permitted and even encouraged them. He should be tried, convicted and publicly executed for these crimes.

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  • ash
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Not quite - they all give a straight answer saying that the US does not torture. But then they unequivocally refuse to give us a definition of torture. Talk about parsing your words, redefining the definition of "IS"!!!!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Simple.

    We instruct those supportive of our economic dominance in the latest torture techniques.

    We have for generations.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Bush has always given a straight answer. the U.S. does not support torture. Why are you so confused?

    waterboarding is not torture, btw

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