Why does February only have 28 days instead of regular 30?

17 Answers

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  • Rick K
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    For some ridiculous reason, to which, however, I’ve no desire to be disloyal,

    Some person in authority, I don’t know who, very likely the Astronomer Royal,

    Has decided that, although for such a beastly month as February,

    twenty-eight days as a rule are plenty,

    One year in every four his days shall be reckoned as nine and twenty.

    Source(s): The Pirate King, in The pirates of Penzance
  • 1 decade ago

    Roman calendar are sparse and sketchy, legend has it that Romulus, the first king of Rome, devised a 10-month lunar calendar that began at the spring equinox in March and ended with December. It is unclear whether there were any official months between December and March, but it's likely they were left off because the wintertime wasn't important for the harvest.

    The second king of Rome, Numa Pompilius, decided to make the calendar more accurate by syncing it up with the actual lunar year—which is about 354 days long. Numa tacked on two months—January and February—after December to account for the new days.

    ...the rest of the story is here: http://www.slate.com/id/2159747

  • 1 decade ago

    They haven't been able to properly distribute the days of the year without things really screwing up over time weather wise...i.e., eventually winter would be delayed until February if you worked the days out evenly, so they short changed February to make up for it. It's a good thing really, because since it's a winter month, it's better to have a short month in winter than summer, and also, it's a great place to throw in the leap year extra day. :)

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Actually it is because Months were named after Ceasers during the roman times. The Ceaser Augusto wanted more days in His month so he took them from February.I cant remember why from that particular Ceaser ..

    \

    The original Roman year had 10 named months. Julius moved the beginning of the year from Marius to Januarius and changed the number of days in several months to be odd, a lucky number. After Februarius there was occasionally an additional month of Intercalaris "intercalendar". This is the origin of the leap-year day being in February. In 46 BC, Julius Caesar reformed the Roman calendar (hence the Julian calendar) changing the number of days in many months and removing Intercalaris.

    Source(s): Ok there you go.. History of Months website.
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I think its because February is the month leap year is. So on leap year, it goes to 29 and other times, it goes to 28.

  • 1 decade ago

    Some DO have 31.

  • 1 decade ago

    Well, it all has to add up to 365 1/4 somehow.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It's long enough at 28.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    because there are 365 days in a year and somehow the months have to be made to work out to that.

  • 1 decade ago

    Someone Screwed Up.

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