In what contexts does the word hast in German mean hate?

I've been told by my German teacher that hast means both hate and have, so I'm wondering in what situations it switches from have to hate, because well, I don't want to say hate in a situation, when I had ment have.

Update:

I know it means both hate and have, I'm asking what type of situations does it become one or the other in.

Update 2:

Is the why you pronouce the du form of hassen " hasst" different sounding then the du form of haben?

11 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    "du hast" = "you have"--from the infinitive "haben"

    "du hasst"="you hate"--from the infinitive "hassen"

    Different words, different spellings, same pronunciation.

    Rammstein used this effectively in their song "Du hast." The discussion generated by this song and its ambiguous translation has kept the song alive in high-school German classes since its release.

    Source(s): I teach high-school German, and, yes, we listen to Rammstein!
  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

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    RE:

    In what contexts does the word hast in German mean hate?

    I've been told by my German teacher that hast means both hate and have, so I'm wondering in what situations it switches from have to hate, because well, I don't want to say hate in a situation, when I had ment have.

    Source(s): contexts word hast german hate: https://biturl.im/HZvL2
  • 1 decade ago

    Its Have, but like in a Ramistine song, Du hast, its a play on words, it can mean both, depends on the context or what you are saying

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    My friend who is an exchange student from germany told me the same thing. The meaning and spelling change but the way you say the word doesn't. So when you are talking you shouldn't have a problem. hast is have. hass is hate.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I was wondering that same thing last night. I think it does mean hate and have. Du hast mesh = You hate me

    Du hast ein hund = You have a dog

    I think it works both ways.

  • Rain
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    There is a difference in spelling:

    du hast = you have (haben - have)

    du hasst = you hate (hassen - hate)

    Source(s): native
  • 1 decade ago

    when rhamistien is singing it du hast it means hate!

  • 1 decade ago

    du hast=you have

    but i hate is ich hasse

    so du hasSt would be you hate (note double s!)

    note: Day of Black Sun - it would be 'du hasst MICH' not mesh

  • 1 decade ago

    hast means have

    hasse is hate

    Source(s): I study german
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It means you have

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