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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsCycling · 1 decade ago

mountain bike fork?

i ve been riding my bike with little air pressure in my fork. my fork has 130mm travel and now it looks like it has 50 mm travel. if i put air in my fork it should kome back up to 130 mmright?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Yes.....and don't ride it that way for very long. Bottoming out is rough on the internals and fork parts are a pain to fix and sometimes expensive.

    If this is the same Minute 3 fork from your other question, then you want to start with the SPV pressure (the red valve on the right leg). Start out with at least 30psi and you can adjust that later.

    Next air up the main spring on the left leg (all black valve)......the best way to do that is by measuring sag, it's hard to give you a ballpark pressure to start with because different bike setups and your own weight all affect it. Wrap a zip tie around the slider so that it's snug but not tight.....slide it down to the bottom and when the fork compresses it'll act as an indicator of travel distance. You want from 20%-30% of your travel to be taken up in static sag (how much it compresses when you're just sitting still on the bike). This will measure about 1" to 1-1/2". Add or subtract air pressure until you get this much sag.

    That's mostly it. You can adjust the SPV pressure to make it easier or harder to begin compressing the fork into its normal travel once you hit a bump. You should adjust your rebound setting (the blue dial on the bottom of the right leg) where you like it (faster rebound for chatter surfaces and slower for regular riding and bigger bumps. You can also adjust the SPV bottom-out volume.....you may need the special socket for that, or your model might have a tool-free adjustment. If you crank it in, the fork won't use as much of its travel before it ramps up and gets stiff (good for drops and big hits). If you back it out, you'll have a more plush fork but will risk bottoming out on rough stuff.

    Play around with it at different settings.....it may take several rides before you find out how you like it best. Keep notes so you can remember or pick a combination for the trail you happen to be riding that day. And get into the habit of checking the air pressures each time you ride, at least until you know if or how much air leaks out from ride to ride. Most forks will hold air for quite awhile but some leak slowly. It's a good habit to get into.

    On your other question, I put the Manitou website link where you can find user and service manuals for your fork. Hope this helps....good luck with it and post back if you need more help! :o)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes, if your seals are still in good shape. Sounds like you have too little air in it now. Make sure not to put in more than the recommended pressure.

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