Symbolism in Botticelli's painting, "The Birth of Venus"?

an analysis of the symbols in it. website if you have. thanks.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Some ideas to get you started:

    “The classical poets had been known all through the Middle Ages, but only at the time of the Renaissance, when the Italians tried so passionately to recapture the former glory of Rome, did the classical myths become popular among educated laymen. To these men, the mythology of the admired Greeks and Romans represented something more than gay and pretty fairy-tales. They were so convinced of the superior wisdom of the ancients that they believed these classical legends must contain some profound and mysterious truth. The patron who commissioned the Botticelli painting for his country villa was a member of the rich and powerful family of the Medici. Either he himself, or one of his learned friends, probably explained to the painter what was known of the way the ancients had represented Venus rising from the sea. To these scholars the story of her birth was the symbol of mystery through which the divine message of beauty came into the world. One can imagine that the painter set to work reverently to represent this myth in a worthy manner. The action of the picture is quickly understood. Venus has emerged from the sea on a shell which is driven to the shore by flying wind-gods amidst a shower of roses. As she is about to step on to the land, one of the Hours or Nymphs receives her with a purple cloak.”

    (http://www.artchive.com/artchive/B/botticelli/venu...

    “In the Birth of Venus, by Sandro Botticelli, the classical Goddess Venus is emerging from the water on a shell, held up by the Zephyrs, symbols of spiritual passions, and with one of the Ores, goddesses of the seasons, who is handing her a flowered cloak. The naked goddess isn't then a symbol of earthly but of spiritual love, like an ancient marble statue, slim and long-limbed, with harmonious features.”

    (...)

    “On the surface, the painting is about a Classical myth: Venus, the goddess of love (the nude woman at the center of the composition) has been born from the sea, and is being gently blown to shore by Zephyrus, god of the winds, as another goddess waits on shore to cover Venus with a cloak. However, most of the original viewers of the painting would have recognized a set of Christian associations as well. Venus's modesty, despite her nudity, and her pose refer to standard portrayals of the Virgin Mary. Zephyrus is recognizable as an angel, while the figure on the right refers to another standard religious subject, the baptism of Christ: specifically the way St. John the Baptist is usually pictured.”

    (http://www.respree.com/cgi-bin/SoftCart.exe/poster...

    “Some scholars suggest that the Venus painted for Lorenzo and mentioned by Giorgio Vasari may have been a different work, now lost. Some experts believe it to be a celebration of the love of Giuliano di Piero de' Medici (who died in the Pazzi conspiracy in 1478) for Simonetta Cattaneo Vespucci, who lived in Portovenere, a town by the sea with a local tradition of being the birthplace of Venus. It must be noted that Botticelli himself also privately loved the beautiful Simonetta, who was de' Medici's mistress. Whatever inspired the artist, there are clear similarities to Ovid's Metamorphoses and Fasti, as well as to Poliziano's Verses. Simonetta is also believed to have been the model for Venus in this painting, as well as for several other women in other Botticelli works, such as Primavera.”

    (http://www.topofart.com/artists/Alessandro_Filippe...

  • 4 years ago

    The Birth Of Venus Analysis

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Birth Of Venus Painter

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/awMJv

    Sir William's answer is basically correct. The birth of the roman goddess Venus is described in the literature much as you see it in the image--she rises from the froth of the ocean--and that's an icky detail I won't go into here. And since she is the goddess of love, beauty, sex and fertility, she is personified (or portrayed) as an idealized female nude. The reason Botticelli painted her was for a patron, somebody commissioned him to paint the image. In those days artists didn't paint on speculation and hope to sell the painting afterward. Somebody hired him to paint that image. Why did the patron want Venus? Because it was a socially acceptable reason to have an image of a beautiful female nude in ones home. Beyond the titillation factor, it showed your guests that you were an educated man (you can count the number of female patrons in that era on your fingers,) because you were familiar with the classical myths. (Wink, wink.)

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Symbolism in Botticelli's painting, "The Birth of Venus"?

    an analysis of the symbols in it. website if you have. thanks.

    Source(s): symbolism botticelli 39 painting quot birth venus quot: https://shortly.im/fjKS4
  • Anonymous
    5 years ago
  • 7 years ago

    a website for "The Birth of Venus", if it can help you http://www.oilpaintingpd.com/the-cafe-terrace-on-t...

  • 1 decade ago

    Yes about rein.

    Source(s): sam
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