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MC asked in EnvironmentGreen Living · 1 decade ago

What are some important environmental considerations to take into account when buying a home?

My partner and I are currently looking to buy a new home. We are both environmentalists in some capacity, so we would like it to be as green as possible. We live near a large city, and we have a fairly standard buget. I would like to ask the following questions: What sort of home for two adults would be the most environmentally sound? What environmentally-friendly features should we be looking for in a new home? What can we do to improve the environmental performance of our home after we have moved in? Any suggestions will be appreciated.

Thank you.

8 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Buy a home wherein there are trees around. Trees will give you enough supply of oxygen and they will help you during rainy season as wind breakers and as absorbers of rain waters.

    GOD SAVE MOTHER EARTH.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Aldo Leopold's name is well known and many have read his books, especially "A Sand County Almanac." What some may not know if that after his stint with the forest service, he bought property in Wisconsin.

    What Leopold purchased was an abandoned farm on the Wisconsin River near Baraboo. The only structure on the property was a chicken coop, fondly called "the Shack." Here Leopold put his beliefs into action, planting trees, restoring the prairies, and documenting the changes in plants and animals.

    So you could go that route, which would be incredibly rewarding and tie up your free time for at least 5 years.

    But to answer your question more directly, what I'd look for is a home that is blended into surroundings of grass, earth and hills, a house that is energy-efficient so your bills will remain low.

    The site below has some additional suggestions. Good luck to you both!

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  • 1 decade ago

    Well sealed windows, frames and doorways prevent energy waste. Radiant heat under the floors is a fairly big project, but combined with a solar water heater, it gives you a very low-impact way to heat your home. If you live in Alaska that might not be great for you. If you live somewhere sunny, consider roof-mounted panels. For about 7000 dollars you can put in a rig that covers your house usage and generates excess which must BY LAW be bought back by the utility company (Kiplinger's, green issue 2007). Granted its not a ton of money, but in the reduction of utility bills alone it pays for itself in about 10 years (Dunno how long term you're thinking). Those spiral energy-saving bulbs are good value in all the lights in your house.

    That being said, houses are second in energy dumpage only to cars. If you're in the right area, sign up for auto manufacturer's fuel cell car test zones, usually listed on company websites. In reality though the most environmentally friendly way for two adults to live is in an apartment in close proximity to public transportation. Yeah it sucks. So did Katrina and the tsunami.

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  • 1 decade ago

    All things being equal, the smaller the home the less environmental impact it makes...from using less resources to build it, to consuming fewer resources to maintain, ie gas, electricity, etc. Also, check carefully the house's orientation to sun, wind etc. If you have a living room facing west and a huge picture window, that's a lot of heat coming in your home, no matter how well insulated and how good your windows are. Also, hard in newer subdivisions, good tree placement can cut your energy consumption. If buying new, and presumably taking a mortgage to do it, spend the extra and get the highest SEER air conditioning, energy-wise appliances, etc. you can afford. Then they are in your mortgage and can be paid off over a long time, you will break even long before their useful life ends (in most cases). Also, set up a regular maintenance schedule for your home. Clean filters regularly.....check seals and caulking around windows every April and october, for example. A lot easier to keep to with a new home, helps your resale value too!! Good luck.

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  • 1 decade ago

    There are many considerations

    1 how much for heat and other utilities. If you live in a cold winter area you will be using a lot of fuel

    see: http://www.ecohouseinfo.com

    2 are there plenty of south facing window with a clear shot at the sunlight. Find out about passive and active solar energy at click on http://www.sunlighttech.com

    3. See if there is anyone near you making biodiesel products or veggie oil conversions...it's good to have a support group and you can look up http://www.trafficorganic.com

    That's a start....Good Luck

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  • 1 decade ago

    Get away from any Industrial vicinity , and from the road highways. A hilly area is prefered for the flow of air. Morning sun facing the door. House to be roomy and free flow of ventilation. Grow ample plants and trees for the exchange of oxygen aroung your home. Good drainage system as ponding water breed mosquitoes.

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  • Jim
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Er... maybe you could move to a desert...its really cheap and environmentally sound, a perfect home for people like you(if you don't mind the heat), whats more, you can install solar panels; there's no lack of solar energy there, I think.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I would recommend checking out http://www.greenandsave.com -- they offer tons of suggestions for things that you can do to your home to make it more eco-friendly

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