The Capricorn myth in Greek mythology involving Pan?

What exactly is the myth in Greek mythology that involves the god Pan? The one with the sea-goat? Its is supposed to explain the sign.

Update:

I'm not talking about stars. I'm talking about Pan in the Capricorn astrology myth.

5 Answers

Relevance
  • Mirko
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    - One myth[citation needed] that would seem to be invented to justify a connection of Pan with Capricorn says that when Aigipan, that is Pan in his goat-god aspect,[5] was attacked by the monster Typhon, he dove into the Nile; the parts above the water remained a goat, but those under the water transformed into a fish.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_(mythology)#Capri...

    - ...The association of the goat with Capricorn clearly dates back to ancient Babylon, at least. The Greeks related the sign to the horned god Pan. The image of the hybrid goat-fish creature crresponds to the tale of Pan's encounter with the beast Typhon. Attempting to escape the dreaded monster, Pan turned his lower half into a fish, in order to swiftly swim away. However, here again, the association of Capricorn with water, also dates to earlier cultures...

    http://www.mythinglinks.org/euro~west~greece~Pan.h...

    - AIGIPAN (or Aegipan) was one of the goat-footed gods known as Panes. When the gods fled from the monstrous giant Typhoeus and hid themselves in animal form, Aigipan assumed the form of a fish-tailed goat. Later he came to the aid of Zeus in his battle with creature, by stealing back his stolen sinews. As a reward the king of the gods placed him amongst the stars as the Constellation Capricorn. The mother of Aigipan, Aix (the goat), was perhaps associated with the constellation Capra.

    Aigipan was often equated with Pan. However in at least one Athenian vase painting the two appear side by side as distinct divinities in the retinue of Dionysos.

    AE′GIPAN (Aigipan), that is, Goat-Pan, was according to some statements a being distinct from Pan, while others regard him as identical with Pan. His story appears to be altogether of late origin. According to Hyginus (Fab. 155) he was the son of Zeus and a goat, or of Zeus and Aega, the wife of Pan, and was transferred to the stars. (Hygin. Poct. Astr. ii. 13. § 28.) Others again make Aegipan the father of Pan, and state that he as well as his son was represented as half goat and half fish. (Eratosth. Catast. 27.) When Zeus in his contest with the Titans was deprived of the sinews of his hands and feet, Hermes and Aegipan secretly restored them to him and fitted them in their proper places. (Apollod. i. 6. § 3 ; Hygin. Poet. Astr. l. c.) According to a Roman tradition mentioned by Plutarch (Parallel. 22), Aegipan had sprung from the incestuous intercourse of Valeria of Tusculum and her father Valerius, and was considered only a different name for Silvanus.

    AEGO′CERUS (Aigokerôs), a surname of Pan, descriptive of his figure with the horns of a goat, but is more commonly the name given to one of the signs of the Zodiac. (Lucan, ix. 536; Lucret. v. 614; C. Caes. Germ. in Arat. 213.)

    Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.

    http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/Aigipan.html

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Pan is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music: paein means to pasture. He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat.

    The constellation Capricornus is often depicted as a sea-goat, a goat with a fish's tail. One myth that would seem to be invented to justify a connection of Pan with Capricorn says that when Aigipan, that is Pan in his goat-god aspect, was attacked by the monster Typhon, he dove into the Nile; the parts above the water remained a goat, but those under the water transformed into a fish.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    This constellation is one that has retained a mythological explanation which predates the Greeks. Capricorn, the Seagoat, is thought to be the image of a powerful Babylonian deity named Ea. He has the lower half of a fish and the head and torso of a goat. The god lived in the ocean. He came out every day to watch over the land, and he returned to the sea every night. The Greek version of this legend does not match with the physical description of the Seagoat. Greeks thought that the starry figure was Pan, a Greek demigod. Pan had the upper half of a man, but he had the legs of a goat. He was the son of Hermes and a forest nymph. According to legend, when the nymph saw her strange baby, she shrieked in fear and ran away. Hermes, however, loved his strange son. He took him to Olympus, where the other gods and goddesses also took a liking to Pan. He became the god of shepherds and flocks, taking the responsibility from his father. He did not dwell on Olympus; he preferred to live among the shady trees in the mountains. He amused himself by playing his beloved reed pipes (known as Panpipes), or by chasing nymphs through the woods.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    I'm not sure what you're talking about.. i think pan was lke the leader of evil nymphs or something like that.. i'm not sure. =/ sorry

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    Are you talking about Stars?

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.