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How did the civil war affect the united states?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    The Civil War affected the United Sates in a ton of ways. Right after the Civil War, during the Reconstruction era, the Civil War helped "modernize" the South. Before the Civil War, the South was mostly rural area and lacked transportation. After the Civil War, the northern Carpetbaggers came to the South to help them recover from the war, they gave the south roads, introduced factories, and education.

    In the long run, the factories that were introduced to the south contributes today to the grown southern economy. Today the fastest growing area in the United States economically wise, is Atlanta Georgia. In addition, many car companies have begun to open car factories in southern area. In recent years, the US population has started slowly move back to the inner area's of the country due to the growing economy and job opportunities given by the Southern areas. More importantly, the result of the Civil War was to determine if the US was going to split into two countries, The United States of America and The Confederate States of America.

    I forgot to mention though, that today the poor education from back then reflects on the education in the South today, statistically speaking, the southern areas of the United States have the lowest test scores.

    Yah, I just took my unit test on this like four days ago so it's still fresh in my mind XD.

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  • 5 years ago

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    How did the civil war affect the united states?

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  • 4 years ago

    Slavery didn't "cause the Civil War" - the reason for the Civil War was that the Southern states seceded from the Union, and the North (the Union) wanted to make them come back, but the South (the Confederacy) wanted to be an independent nation of its own. The North wanted a strong central or federal government; the South wanted individual states to be able to decide things on their own (known as "States' Rights"). This all happened in 1861 when South Carolina was the first state to secede. Slavery didn't become an issue until late 1862 and then it really "exploded" into the situation with Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation which took effect on Jan. 1, 1963. Of coures, that proclamation only "freed" the slaves owned by people in the South, and since they didn't recognize Abe Lincoln as THEIR president (theirs was Jefferson Davis), the proclamation really freed NO ONE.

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  • 1 decade ago

    well dear, the civil war split the country in half basically way back in 1861. The Southern and Northern states on the east coast (mostly because the rest of the states weren't actually states yet) went to war over MANY basic beliefs, only ONE of which was slavery. The war ended and resulted in a more united nation, the abolition of slavery, and the reconstruction of several large southern cities like Atlanta on our way to being grown ups again. Then the president got shot and everything went crazy! But here we are in the 21st century, with many benefits that came from that very war.

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  • Anna
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

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    In a multiplicity of ways. Differing views on slavery nearly torpedoed the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Many compromises and accommodations were made to slave states in order to keep them as part of the union. The question of how slaves should be counted for purposes of proportional representation was a point over which delegates argued for many days. The economic basis of the southern agrarian economy was predicated upon the availability of slaves. Southerners fought to protect their ability to bring slaves into the country and northern abolitionists opposed them tooth and nail. Many thought that the slavery question should have been settled in the Constitution. But our Founding Document could never have been ratified had the northern states not decided to let the question ripen over time. The result was nearly 100 years of acrimony and ever more fixed and opposite positions.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago
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  • 1 decade ago

    It totally defines that the Unions are much more victorious than the Confederates

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