What's the derivation of the Yiddish ongepotchket, ongepatchket, ungepachket, ongepatcht, umgepatcht?

This word is spelled many different ways. I know the meaning, but cannot find the anything about the derivation. It appears to be an adjective built on a Germanic past participle... or something.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    It is indeed an adjective based on a past participle, namely of the verb 'onpatshken', to sully. The stem of the verb is Slavic, and the prefix is Germanic, cognate with German an-. The differences in spelling reflect both the various ways of spelling Yiddish words with Roman letters, as well as differences in dialect -- 'un' is southern, and 'on' is northern. According to the YIVO system used by scholars to write Yiddish words with Roman letters, the word is spelled 'ongepatshket,' but all your spellings are fine except the second to last , which means 'slapped,' and the last, which doesn't mean anything.

    As a side note, the same Slavic root gives rise to another less common Yinglish word, 'potchkey,' meaning to fiddle around.

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  • 1 decade ago

    the meaning would help. ungepackt -which does not have the h that appears in all your forms - in German is an adjective meaning 'unpacked'. It has the form of a verb unpacken, as you suggest, but I can't find that - I find auspacken and ausgepackt.

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