Yahoo Answers is shutting down on May 4th, 2021 (Eastern Time) and beginning April 20th, 2021 (Eastern Time) the Yahoo Answers website will be in read-only mode. There will be no changes to other Yahoo properties or services, or your Yahoo account. You can find more information about the Yahoo Answers shutdown and how to download your data on this help page.

Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceSmall Business · 1 decade ago

How to value a small privately owned ltd company?

Hi,

Just wondering how you would value a company if we were to create shares within the business.

This case would not be for sale, but a valuation to distribute share to employees and appropriate the correct current valuation of these shares and also appropriate any tax associated.

We have very few assets - maybe £2k worth

Turnover is fairly good (250k) and profit is about (75k)

I have looked on the web and it's very confusing, just want some pointers.

Update:

Hi, Just to clarify, this is a UK based company... :)

4 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Companies with employee share ownership tend to do better than those that don't, so distributing shares to employees is a sound idea. You will end up with fewer, but more valuable shares. As a rule of thumb, shares valued at 5% -10% of an employee's after tax pay are considered to be a suitable incentive.

    While you can use Price/Earnings and Price/Revenue multipliers of similar public companies as a guide, the multipliers for your company will be different because the risk profile of a small company is different. Your company's multipliers will be at the low end of the scale.

    Any distribution of stock is in effect a sale of the company. The shares will have no value to the employees and may even cause dissatisfaction if your company does not provide a mechanism for the employees to sell their shares. If you don't want outsiders involved, make a rule that employees can sell only to one another or to the company. This means that the company valuation will need to be done at least once per year in a manner that is seen as fair to all involved. An independent appraiser will be needed and this will be an added cost.

    There are legal issues with employee stock plans. Be aware that more stringent regulations take effect as the number of shareholders grows. At minimum, your company with have increased reporting requirements and increased accounting costs. If your company ever becomes public, the regulators will need to be satisfied that all grants of shares were within 10% of fair market value at the time of the grant.

    As an alternative to distributing shares, consider allocating a part of the company's profit to a profit sharing program. That way you hold all the shares, get a lot of the benefit and avoid most of the costs.

    Source(s): 1. The Stock Options Book http://www.nceo.org/ 2. My company is dealing with the same issue.
  • 6 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    How to value a small privately owned ltd company?

    Hi,

    Just wondering how you would value a company if we were to create shares within the business.

    This case would not be for sale, but a valuation to distribute share to employees and appropriate the correct current valuation of these shares and also appropriate any tax associated.

    We have...

    Source(s): small privately owned company: https://biturl.im/GfaXS
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Easiest thing to do is to look at publicly-traded companies in the same industry. Apply their price/earnings ratio to your profit, and that gives you a value for your company. Be sure to calculate profit *after* a reasonable salary is paid for all management services provided by the owners, and *before* any special perks are deducted, like season tickets to the local NFL team or donations to the owners' church.

    There are often formulae for specific industries. For instance, newspapers companies value is based on the number of subscribers, and the amount subscribers pay for the newspaper, despite the fact that advertising revenues are about 80% of a newspaper's income. A tax preparation business generally has a value equal to a year's gross sales. An ISP or a cable company is typically valued at $X per subscriber, no matter how much or how little the subscribers pay, no matter how much or how little the physical plant is worth.

    But for most businesses, the P/E ratio works pretty good as a rule of thumb.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    I would ask to see his books and then take them to an independent accountant and have them go over it. Then contact Clark Howard and ask him this question. He will have tons of questions for you to ask the owner.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.