Max asked in Consumer ElectronicsTVs · 1 decade ago

What is the difference between plasma TV and LCD TV technology ?

Pl. help me to choose a 32 inch TV with comparison between the features in the budget of about 45 000 Rs among LG, Samsung, Sony or anything else in the league.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    A plasma display panel (PDP) is a type of flat panel display now commonly used for large TV displays (typically above 37-inch or 940 mm).

    When choosing between plasma and LCD TVs, you're actually selecting between two competing technologies, both of which achieve similar features (i.e., ,bright crystal-clear images, super color-filled pictures) and come in similar packages (i.e., 3.5 inch depth flat screen casing). To complicate the decision-making process further, price and size are two previous considerations that are rapidly becoming non-issues as LCD TVs are now being made in larger sizes and at competing prices with plasma.

    Despite their similarities, the two technologies are very different in the way they deliver the image to the viewer.

    Plasma technology consists hundreds of thousands of individual pixel cells, which allow electric pulses (stemming from electrodes) to excite rare natural gases-usually xenon and neon-causing them to glow and produce light. This light illuminates the proper balance of red, green, or blue phosphors contained in each cell to display the proper color sequence from the light. Each pixel cell is essentially an individual microscopic florescent light bulb, receiving instruction from software contained on the rear electrostatic silicon board. Look very closely at a plasma TV and you can actually see the individual pixel cell coloration of red, green, and blue bars. You can also see the black ribs which separate each.

    Whether spread across a flat-panel screen or placed in the heart of a projector, all LCD displays come from the same technological background. A matrix of thin-film transistors (TFTs) supplies voltage to liquid-crystal-filled cells sandwiched between two sheets of glass. When hit with an electrical charge, the crystals untwist to an exact degree to filter white light generated by a lamp behind the screen (for flat-panel TVs) or one projecting through a small LCD chip (for projection TVs). LCD TVs reproduce colors through a process of subtraction: They block out particular color wavelengths from the spectrum of white light until they're left with just the right color. And, it's the intensity of light permitted to pass through this liquid-crystal matrix that enables LCD televisions to display images chock-full of colors-or gradations of them.

  • 1 decade ago

    Plasma television technology is based loosely on the fluorescent light bulb. The display itself consists of cells. Within each cell two glass panels are separated by a narrow gap in which neon-xenon gas is injected and sealed in plasma form during the manufacturing process. The gas is electrically charged at specific intervals when the Plasma set is in use. The charged gas then strikes red, green, and blue phosphors, thus creating a television image. Each group of red, green, and blue phosphors is called a pixel (picture element).

    Although Plasma television technology eliminate the need for the bulky picture tube and electron beam scanning of traditional televisions, because it still employs the burning of phosphors to generate an image, Plasma televisions still suffer from some of the drawbacks of traditional televisions, such as heat generation and screen-burn of static images.

    LCD TV Overview

    LCD televisions, on the other hand, use a different technology.

    Basically, LCD panels are made of two layers of transparent material, which are polarized, and are "glued" together. One of the layers is coated with a special polymer that holds the individual liquid crystals. Current is then passed through individual crystals, which allow the crystals to pass or block light to create images. LCD crystals do not produce their own light, so an external light source, such as florescent bulb is needed for the image created by the LCD to become visible to the viewer.

    Unlike standard CRT and Plasma televisions, since there are no phosphors that light up, less power is need for operation and the light source in an LCD television generates less heat than a Plasma or traditional television. Also, because of the nature of LCD technology, there is no radiation emitted from the screen itself.

    Source(s): About.com
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Plasma has a better picture (blacks and contrast but not too much in 1080P), but they have much shorter lifespan. LCD doesn't have as good a contrast but lasts a lot longer than plasma. If you get a 1080p TV and an HD signal you will not be disappointed. Football is probably the greatest thing to watch in HD.

  • 1 decade ago

    Plasma TV's use gas technology and LCD TV's use Liquid Crystals.

    They both offer good pics but LCD is preferred since a burnt bulb on a plasma will be visible and will cause frustration.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Wikipedia articles:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_tv

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LCD_TV

    Reading those will let you understand the difference between the two technologies.

    What you'll probably find is that in the smaller end TVs, LCD technology has surpassed Plasma and costs less. If you want a much larger TV (over 40 inches) you probably need to go plasma.

  • 1 decade ago

    LCD is superior technology, with better resolution and longer life. Until recently, LCD was limited in terms of size, but they now make large screen LCDs. Go with LCD.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    LCD doesn't use plazma, plazma has a better picture but if u live in a high altitude don't get one because it will be ruined by the altitude

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Go with an LCD. they last much longer.. plasma's have about 10,000 hours... then they are shot.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I thought they were the same, lol. I have a LCD flat screen. I love it, so get that one. (:

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