Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsHorse Racing · 1 decade ago

In Horse Racing, what is the difference between a firm, soft, and yielding track condition.?

Does it change the speed of the horse, and by how much in each case?

What is Yielding? What does it mean?

7 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yielding is an Irish description of going: it is what we would call heavy ground here in GB.

    Basically good ground is genuine ground with a bit of spring in it that most horses should run well on.

    Firm ground is ground that has dried out and is therefore firmer to run on. You will find horses run faster on firm ground as there is no give in the ground to slow the speed. However, horses can get injured on firm ground as there is no absorbtion of the shock of the horses foot hitting the ground. If you hear a commentator or trainer say a horse "likes to hear his hooves rattle" they mean the horse runs best on firm ground.

    Soft ground has slightly more give in it than good ground, but is still considered safe for most horses to run on.

    Yielding/heavy ground is very stamina sapping and therefore will slow horses down considerably. Try to imagine yourself running through a muddy field: your feet are being sucked into the mud and you use up a lot of energy.

    I'm not sure about how much (in terms of mph) the ground slows or speeds up a horse but having looked at the last 18 runnings of the 2,000 Guineas (over 1 mile) the fastest running was in 1994 by Mister Baileys in 1.35.08 on Good to Firm ground. The slowest was in 1998 by King of Kings in 1.39.25 on Good to Soft going.

    Hope that helps.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 4 years ago

    1

    Source(s): #1 Groundbreaking Betting Software - http://BettingMachine.oruty.com/?UOL
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/axblH

    Apparently nobody ever watches races, because Quarterhorses (which were so called because they traditionally raced a quarter mile) do fast sprint distances from about 200-300 yards up to 4 1/2 furlongs (a furlong is one-eigth of a mile) and race only straight races on dirt, whereas Thorobreds race on either dirt or turf and anything from about 5 1/2 furlongs (called a sprint) up to 1 1/4 mile or more (called a route) and even longer (The Belmont is 1 1/2 miles, making it the longest stakes race in the U.S.), and the majority of Thorobred races involve turns (as do some of the top-length Quarterhorse races on very small tracks). In Thorobred racing, each horse eventually becomes "proficient" in a particular length of race, so a horse that can run a mile (for example) may not have what it takes to dominate a shorter race (say 6 furlongs, or three-quarters of a mile) because it does not have time to catch the leader. In addition, in Quarterhorse racing there is frequent bumping of the animals as they leave the starting gate, an event which would usually be considered a foul and possible disqualification if it were to occur in a Thorobred race. Finally their physiques are very different, as all Thorobreds today can trace their lineage to several 18th Century racehorses, primarily from the Mid-east.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Obviously the breed, but you knew that. The quarter horses got their name from back when the United States was new, and men raced the horses for sport. Because they seemed to be built as sprinters, they were raced for only a quarter mile. Hence, Quarter Horses. Thoroughbreds, on the other hand, are more of cross country runners. Their races are a mile, sometimes longer. TB's are great for eventing too. As you can see, there are many differences, if you know where to look.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    OK,to start with the different descriptions of the track indicate how much water there is in the ground,with firm less water than yielding.The speed of the horse is governed by the action(way it moves) of that horse.Horses that like yielding ground tend to have a high knee action and can get their feet out of the sticky conditions easier than a low actioned(daisy cutting) horse who skims across the surface.this type is usually suited to fast ground conditions.the range of going descriptions are ..Hard,Firm,Good to Firm,Good,Good to Soft,Soft,Yeilding(irish term meaning soft)and Heavy.After heavy the course is unraceable.

    Source(s): pro.trainer for over 25 years in the uk.
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    I think that the different going descriptions with moisture are as follows; good, yielding, soft, (holding), heavy. Yielding means that the ground yields to the pressure of hooves. For instance the official going at Listowel recently on September 23 was described as good to yielding, so I hardly think that yielding is equivalent to heavy as that would amount to nonsense.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    its about turf tracks,its basicly the heigth of the grass

    Source(s): my name is track daddy
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.