Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthWomen's Health · 1 decade ago

I need advice!?

i have a underactive thyroid. i also had a complete histerectomy in 2000. now ive have a goiter ive had it for about a year. they can not get my thyroid level under control and the doctor acts like they will keep trying to get it right but its been over a year and they havent yet. i also have other things wrong im only 32. does anyone have any idea what i should say to my doctor or what i need to do i feel so bad all the time im really sick of it!! please help any advice is appreciated.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Have you talked to your doctor about your feelings? I know that may not seem important, but they are supposed to seriously take that into consideration. They do originally (hopefully) get into medicine with the idea to help because they care. Some, however don't and while others become jaded, and still others just stop giving a damn. But, sometimes doctors need to be reminded too.

    The patient may need to be referred to a specialist to stabilize treatment in a patient whose thyroid status may be difficult to control, especially in the following cases:

    Mild thyroid failure:

    This should be treated with levothyroxine, especially if the patient presents with thyroid autoantibodies. Monitor treatment of elderly or cardiac patients with only slight elevation of TSH due to the risk of cardiac events

    Coronary heart disease:

    Levothyroxine may precipitate cardiac events such as anginal pain, arrhythmias, tachycardia, and palpitations in patients with underlying coronary heart disease. Treatment in these patients should therefore proceed with caution

    Surgery:

    Patients with mild to moderate hypothyroidism are not at increased risk for perioperative complications. Thyroid hormone replacement should be continued perioperatively

    Patients with severe hypothyroidism (defined as TSH>40 or clinically significant symptoms or myxedema) should have elective surgery postponed pending further treatment

    Guidelines

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has produced the following guideline:

    Update of newborn screening and therapy for congenital hypothyroidism. Pediatrics. 2006;117:2290-303. Also available at the National Guideline Clearinghouse

    The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists have produced the following guidelines:

    AACE medical guidelines for clinical practice for the evaluation and treatment of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Endocr Pract 2002;8:457-69 [2006 amended version]

    The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Thyroid Association, and the Endocrine Society have produced the following statement about levothyroxine:

    Joint statement on the US Food and Drug Administration's decision regarding bioequivalence of levothyroxine sodium. Thyroid 2004;14:486

    The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has produced the following guideline:

    ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 37. Thyroid disease in pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol 2002;100:387-96. Summary available at the National Guideline Clearinghouse

    The American Academy of Family Physicians has published the following information:

    Hueston WJ. Treatment of hypothyroidism. Am Fam Physician 2001;64:1717-24

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that sits low on the front of the neck. Your thyroid lies below your Adam’s apple, along the front of the windpipe. The thyroid has two side lobes, connected by a bridge (isthmus) in the middle. When the thyroid is its normal size, you’re unlikely to be able to feel it.

    All types of hyperthyroidism are due to overproduction of thyroid hormones, but the condition can develop in several ways.

    Thyroid hormone production can be suppressed or halted completely in these ways: https://tr.im/hRqmV

  • Jody
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    They will probably take it out soon if they can't regulate it. I'm not sure why you're having so many health problems, but you need to tell your Dr. that you're ready to give up unless they do something that works. I wish you luck.

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