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Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 decade ago

Did Hitler consult astrology before embarking his troops for battles?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    No - - - ever hear the term 'guilt by association.' With Himmler rambling on about ancient rituals & Nordic Gods and Rudolf Hess with his circle of 'eccentrics' including a few astrologers it is perhaps inevitable that rumours would circulate. And quite frankly in America Evangelical Christians consider astrolgy to be 'Satanic' and so when it is time to 'besmirch' der Fuhrer the notion that Hitler dabbled in astrology is expected.

    Certainly there were astrologers eager to assist the Nazis among them a Karl E Kraft who was a fanatical fan of Hitler and did all he could to get into the inner circle. But no, Hitler was an egotist who did beieve in fate but at the same time Hitler was certain fate was his ally no matter how solid the evidence that fate was not on his side.

    Aside from all that Hitler never really consulted with anyone. He might order Generals to give reports and he might actually listen now and then but truly Hitler only believed in his own twisted logic. At the same time Hitler was 'buggy' about Numbers. Numerology. Which is not the same as Astrology. Hitler was to sort of man you would meet in Las Vegas or Macau, counting the number of slot machines, selecting the 22rd one or consistency betting on 6 at the cr*p table.

    (note to angry Yamsters // a dice game not feal matter)...

    Here is Link and snippets.....

    http://www.meta-religion.com/Esoterism/Astrology/i...

    """"--------------There is no evidence that Hitler himself was interested in astrology, and some evidence that he positively mistrusted it. He is often accused of having a personal astrologer, and the name most often connected with the accusation is that of Karl Ernst Krafft (1900-45). Krafft was born in Switzerland, of German descent, and became a very competent astrologer. He also became a fervent admirer of Hitler, and on 2 November 1939, wrote to a Dr Fosel (then working for the RSHA, Himmler's secret intelligence service) warning that between 7 and 10 November Hitler's life would be in danger because of 'the possibility of an attempt at assassination by the use of explosive material'.

    The Nazis were as disapproving of astrological predictions about the life of the head of state as the Caesars had been, and disregarded the warning. When on 9 November a bomb exploded at the Burgerbrau beer hall in Munich minutes after Hitler had left it, Krafft could not resist sending a telegram to Rudolf Hess pointing out that he had told them so. His original letter to Fosel was dug out of the files and shown to Hitler, who passed it to Dr Goebbels. The same day, Krafft was arrested by the Gestapo and taken in for questioning. He managed to convince them that under certain circumstances such accurate predictions were possible, and was released.

    In 1940, Krafft was summoned to Berlin by Goebbels to look through the prophesies of Nostradamus and translate any of them that could be used as propaganda against the Allies. It was felt that these, if dropped into unoccupied areas, might well do something to persuade the people that government by the Nazis was in the natural order of things. And indeed, after some weeks' work, Krafft claimed to have discovered verses predicting the invasion of Holland and Belgium, and foreseeing the Third Reich and the Second World War. He produced a pamphlet based on forty quatrains of Nostradamus, designed for circulation in Belgium and France, and predicting the imminent downfall of Britain. But in May of 1941, about three months later, Hess, second in command to Hitler (after Goering) flew to Scotland in an independent attempt to arrange a peace - an attempt rewarded by the Allies with over forty years' imprisonment. Martin Bormann decided that the best way of presenting the story to the German people would be to announce that Hess was actually insane, and shortly afterwards it was announced that he had been crazed by 'hypnotists, astrologers and so on'. In Britain, The Times actually reported that Hess had been Hitler's private astrologer!

    This gave the Gestapo the excuse to clamp down on astrology in general, and those who had formerly enjoyed the protection of a sympathetic Himmler (who had arranged the release of one of their number, Wilhelm Wulif, from a concentration camp to work for him and his wife) now found themselves arrested and at worst sent to concentration camps. This delighted a number of members of the Nazi High Command, few of whom admired Himmler, and many of whom regarded him as deranged: Reinhard Heydrich, for instance, used to compare Himmler to another officer, saying 'One is worried about the stars on his epaulette, and the other about the stars in his horoscope!' Along with faith healers, clairvoyants, graphologists, Christian Scientists and spiritualists, astrologers were definitely out of favour. Krafft was among those arrested. In prison, he continued to work for a while on astrological propaganda, but at the end of 1944 caught typhus, and in January of the following year died en route for Buchenwald.

    It is doubtful whether astrology had any effect on the German conduct of the war, despite Himmler's sympathy to it. Even Goebbels was infected, to some extent, for he sent from the besieged Berlin bunker in the last days of the war for copies of Hitler's birth chart and that of the Reich, pointing out to the Fuhrer that both charts agreed in showing the outbreak of war and the present disastrous reverses, but also promised an overwhelming victory for Germany in April, and peace by August. Hitler preferred not to wait for the planetary change, and killed himself.

    In Britain, newspaper horoscopes played a part in keeping up national morale; but the most curious British astrological story of the war is that of Louis de Wohl, a German, part-Jewish, who spent much of its duration in London, having persuaded the government, or at least some members of it, that he could tell them what advice Hitler's astrologers were giving him, and thus predict some of his plans. The venture seems to have been successful only for de Wohl, who made a lot of money from syndicated journalism, worked for the Psychological Warfare Executive's 'black propaganda' unit, and flourished a British army captain's uniform to which he was not entitled. ::

    //----------------- O . u . O ------------------\\Peace...........

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  • 4 years ago

    1

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    2

    Source(s): Discover Numerology http://renditl.info/NumerologySecrets
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  • 4 years ago

    I say a prayer before I answer questions, I ask God to use me as an instrument in communicating His will to the person asking the question.

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  • ?
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Read the Spear of Destiny by Ravenscroft.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    NO one of his henchmen did Nostradamus and they still lost!!!!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No.

    He was a rationalist.

    Source(s): His Table Talk
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  • 1 decade ago

    yes... i think~!

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