Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsBiology · 1 decade ago

if humans evolved from monkeys, what did viruses evolve from?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Viruses evolved from parasitic strands of phenotypic RNA, some 4 billion years ago.

  • 1 decade ago

    That viruses co - evolve with their hosts, like any good parasites.

    * Most viruses of land plants are probably evolved from those in the green algae.

    So, there are many forms of viruses and each has it's own type of evolution.

    Source(s): http://www.mcb.uct.ac.za/tutorial/virorig.html Try this website, it say clearly about the evolution of viruses of different forms, how and when. Hope it helps~!:)
  • 1 decade ago

    Humans didn't evolve from monkeys and viruses as a class of organism are older than humans. If you believe in evolution, then you believe that all life on Earth started out as simple cells to include humans and viruses.

  • 1 decade ago

    According to Wikipedia:

    The origins of modern viruses are not entirely clear. It may be that no single mechanism can account for all viruses. They do not fossilize well, so molecular techniques have been the most useful means of hypothesising how they arose. Research in microfossil identification and molecular biology may yet discern fossil evidence dating to the Archean or Proterozoic eons. Two main hypotheses currently exist.

    Small viruses with only a few genes may be runaway stretches of nucleic acid originating from the genome of a living organism. Their genetic material could have been derived from transferable genetic elements such as plasmids or transposons, which are prone to moving within, leaving, and entering genomes.

    Viruses with larger genomes, such as poxviruses, may have once been small cells which parasitised larger host cells. Over time, genes not required by their parasitic lifestyle would have been lost in a streamlining process known as retrograde-evolution or reverse-evolution. The bacteria Rickettsia and Chlamydia are living cells that, like viruses, can only reproduce inside host cells. They lend credence to the streamlining hypothesis, as their parasitic lifestyle is likely to have caused the loss of genes that enabled them to survive outside a host cell.

    It is hypothetically possible that viruses represent a primitive form of self replicating DNA and are a precursor to life as it is presently defined.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Humans did not evolved from monkeys. So that nullifies your question.

    What does the evolution of virus have to do with that of Homids?

    Hopefully you see the logical flaw in your question. Perhaps you'll pause a moment, think, and then ask the question again in a logical way.

    Source(s): me = biologist
  • 1 decade ago

    Bacteria

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