Can dry brewers yeast replace regular yeast in a pizza crust recipe?

Because I've read somewere than Neapolitan pizza is made with Brewers yeast, and I've only got Brewers yeast so..

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    not the same thing

    no

  • 1 decade ago

    Baker's yeast is used for baking to make dough rise. Brewer's yeast is "deactivated" (dead) and can't make dough rise. If you need it to rise, brewer's yeast won't work.

    Consider using baking power, instead. Using baking power is a "quick bread" solution. You can use the following goole.com search to find recipes...

    "quick bread" pizza "baking powder"

    the quotes are important for quality of results. They tell google to look for the enclosed words as a phrase.

    You can also just search on the phrase "quick bread" to find alternatives to pizza.

    I found a reference to Neoapolitan Pizza that mentions using brewer's yeast (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pizza). However, it may not be accurate. It probably would not hurt to use brewer's yeast, it just won't do what baker's yeast does.

    If you need more help, contact your local librarian.

    Many library web sites have a link where you can chat online with a librarian 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!

    Source(s): The Cooks Thesaurus--Yeast... http://www.foodsubs.com/LeavenYeast.html Yeast supplement? Try baking bread instead Chicago Sun-Times, May 9, 2001 by Sheldon Margen, M.D. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4155/is_20... Wikipedia.org--Quick Bread http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quick_bread
  • 1 decade ago

    The primary reason you'd use a specific yeast is for how much you want it to ferment. For example, champagne requires a yeast that can survive high amounts of alochol, in order that it won't die off before converting large amounts of sugar. Aside from that, you should be ok substituting one yeast for another, but might end up spending more on a specialized product.

    Source(s): www.homebrew.com
  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, of course...just disolve in warm, tepid, water add a pinch of sugar. Careful, no salt. Allow to foam up before adding to flour.

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  • Bob
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Can be switched.

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