Is it true that ICELAND and GREENLAND are actually opposite of their names?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Yes.

    The name "Greenland" comes from Scandinavian settlers. In the Icelandic sagas, it is said that Norwegian-born Erik the Red was exiled from Iceland for murder. He, along with his extended family and thralls, set out in ships to find the land that was rumoured to be to the northwest. After settling there, he named the land Grænland ("Greenland"), possibly in order to attract more people to settle there. Greenland was also called Gruntland ("Ground-land") and Engronelant (or Engroneland) on early maps. Whether "Green" is an erroneous transcription of Grunt ("Ground"), which refers to shallow bays, or vice versa, is not known. It should also be noted, however, that the southern portion of Greenland (not covered by glacier) is indeed very green in the summer, and was likely even greener in Erik's time because of the Medieval Warm Period.

    Although there is some evidence indicating an early presence of Irish monks, it is generally believed that Iceland was discovered and settled by Norse explorers in the second half of the 9th century AD. The first permanent Norse settler was Ingólfur Arnarson, who built his homestead in Reykjavík in 874. Ingólfur was followed by many other emigrant settlers, largely Norsemen and their Irish slaves. By 930, most arable land had been claimed and the Althing, a legislative and judiciary parliament, founded as the political hub of the Icelandic Free State. Christianity was peacefully adopted in 1000. The Free State lasted until 1262, at which point the political system devised by the original settlers proved unable to cope with the increasing power of Icelandic chieftains.

    Source(s): wikipedia
  • 1 decade ago

    Iceland is exactly as it sounds, Ice cold. Greenland was a trick the early Vikings used to try to establish a homeland there. It did not work in the long run. I'm not sure of the total population but Rhode Island has more people.

  • 4 years ago

    I visited Iceland last summer and it had a lot of volcanic rock for the landscape. There was some pretty wildflowers and mountains. I don't remember seeing a single tree except in the city of Reykjavik. Greenland is higher and probably has more ice. Greenland is physically part of North America, but is politically European.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Iceland is pretty accurate. Greenland isn't. It was marketing spin by the Vikings to get people to go there.

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  • yes, but that doesn't mean that it doesn't get nasty and cold in iceland lol. but the weather is less brutal than it is in greenland. the vikings who discovered iceland and it's abundant natural resources wanted to keep iceland for themselves, so they gave it an unpleasant sounding name. they then gave greenland (another discovery of theirs) it's name to try and fool other europeans to go there instead.

    those vikings were pretty smart guys, no? lol.

  • 1 decade ago

    Yep, it's true.. I learned this in History class back in middle school.. As told by me, they were named that way to lure the vikings to greenland way back when. I wish I had more detailed information on this for you, but thats all I can remember.

  • 1 decade ago

    they're both icy, but parts of greenland may have been quite green when Erik the Red visited

  • 3lixir
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Yes, it's true. Their names are completely the opposite of what they actually seem.

  • 1 decade ago

    true, i learned it in elementary school. also if you look at a satellite image of the earth, like at google earth, you can see picture of the two countries.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    true i saw it on the mighty ducks

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