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i'am growing a tomato plant in a pot, it flowers but will not give fruit ?

the tomato plant is very healthy and flowers all the time but it will not give fruit, i feed and water at the right times... what could be the problem !!!!

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Not true...tomatoes are self pollinating. You can give the flowers a little tap to help dislodge the pollen and let it float to the other flowers, but this shouldn't be necessary.

    How big is the pot you're growing it in? Tomatoes need a pretty sizable container for proper root development.

    You should not be feeding/fertilizing the plant at this point in the year. That is to be done in the spring, before flowers develop. Nitrogen based fertilizer encourages leaves, not fruit.

    If you have flowers, you will have fruit, if there is enough time in your area before frost kills the plant. When did you plant it? Where do you live? And what variety are you growing? The answers to these questions will determine if or when you can expect tomatoes. Some varieties produce considerably later than others. If you planted too late, you may not have time for ripe tomatoes before the end of your growing season.

    If you get tomatoes, and frost is predicted, pick the ones that have even a slight blush of color to them. Leave them on the counter, they will eventually ripen. I have had tomatoes just ripening in time for Christmas this way!

    You can also eat the green ones...some people like to batter and fry them.

    Good luck...if you provide more details I can tell you more...

    Source(s): experience and http://www.gardenweb.com/forums/tomato
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    A high potash fertiliser is good for tomatoes, but if you're getting plenty of flowers, you will get fruit so long as there is sufficient water.

    Some varieties fruit quite late, I think you will find you should get some fruit beginning soon.

    As it's in a pot, just bring it indoors when frost is expected, it will continue to grow, if you make sure it gets plenty of light.

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  • 4 years ago

    There are diverse the variety to clone diverse flora; cuttings - as you're doing - artwork nicely for some and much less nicely for others. Vine flora like tomatoes are suitable rooted on a similar time as nevertheless related to the parent. Bury a branch and wait each week or so. shop that area moist (not moist). detect and you're very probable to be sure roots more desirable from the branch. as quickly as the roots are nicely more desirable, decrease the branch off and flow the clone to its new homestead. different techniques can and do artwork yet it extremely is extremely undemanding and works extremely nicely.

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  • 1 decade ago

    U need another 2 or3 plants so it can pollinate. I made the same mistake with my first garden. according to my friend, mr. Ben (84; grew up on a farm) "U need 5 of any plant so they pollinate. Do I need to explain to U the male/female process?"

    Source(s): Mr. Ben
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The flowers are not being pollinated; you need to be sure to help it along by using a paint brush to move pollen from one flower to another.

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